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Face to Face 2018

Face to Face is the largest, most comprehensive arts in education conference in New York StateThrough a wide variety of panels, workshops, reports, and other presentations, the conference gives arts in education practitioners the opportunity to think deeply and learn more about arts in education. The conference offers something for everyone: arts administrators, teaching artists, school personnel, parents, and representatives of community-based organizations.  An array of exciting presenters  share best practices; discuss local, state, national, and international policies; and address enduring issues such as quality, assessment, sustainability, professional development, equity and inclusion, and art and social justice.

For a detailed brochure of this year’s activities and programming click HERE

For information on Keynote Speakers Luis J. Rodriguez and D. Fox Harrell click HERE 

 

D. Fox Harrell Keynote Video

Louis Rodriguez Keynote Video

 

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Walk-up Registration:  April 4 – April 5, 2018 (starting at 8:30 AM)

You may register at the door for $200 (check or credit card only).

Note:  There are no shared registrations or single-day rates. Registrations are NOT TRANSFERABLE.

If you wish to become a member you may do so and then receive the discounted price. Otherwise, you must register as a non-member. To become a member, visit www.nycaieroundtable.org.

PLEASE NOTE:

Online Face to Face registration is a two-step process this year.

For Organizations Registering Multiple Participants: Once you submit this registration form with payment and the list of names and emails for your group, we will send a follow-up email to each individual on your list, asking them to register for specific breakouts and provide some additional information.

For Individuals:  Once you submit this registration with your payment, we will send a follow-up email through which you can register for specific breakouts and provide us with some additional information.

The City College of New York is an accessible campus, for more information click HERE

Face to Face is sponsored in part by the generosity of the following donors:

     

Face to Face 2017

Face to Face 2017: Schedule and Breakout

Face to Face 2017 | Keynote Speakers | NYSCA Face to Face Regrant Program 2017

Session room location information is provided at the conference and on our Guidebook App.
PLEASE NOTE THAT BREAKFAST AND LUNCH ARE PROVIDED BOTH DAYS.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017
8:30 AM-9:30 AM:  Registration, Breakfast, Networking, Materials Display (2nd Floor)

9:30 AM-10:00 AM:  Welcome/Opening Remarks

Kati Koerner, Roundtable Co-Chair; Theodore Wiprud, Roundtable Co-Chair; Mary Erina Driscoll

Face to Face Arts in Education Conference 2018

Face to Face is the largest, most comprehensive arts in education conference in New York StateThrough a wide variety of panels, workshops, reports, and other presentations, the conference gives arts in education practitioners the opportunity to think deeply and learn more about arts in education. The conference offers something for everyone: arts administrators, teaching artists, school personnel, parents, and representatives of community-based organizations.  An array of exciting presenters  share best practices; discuss local, state, national, and international policies; and address enduring issues such as quality, assessment, sustainability, professional development, equity and inclusion, and art and social justice.

For information on Keynote Speakers Luis J. Rodriguez and D. Fox Harrell click HERE 

 

D. Fox Harrell Keynote Video

Luis Rodriguez Keynote Video

 

Face to Face is sponsored in part by the generosity of the following donors:

 

NYSCA Face to Face Regrant Program 2017

Face to Face 2017Schedule and Breakout Sessions | Keynote Speakers

 

Update:  The application period for the NYSCA Face to Face Regrant Program 2017 has now closed.

The Roundtable accepted applications to the NYSCA Face to Face Upstate (& Long Island) Arts Eductor & NYC Unaffiliated Teaching Artists Subsidy Program.

Qualified applicants from upstate New York (and Long Island) were invited to submit an application for funds toward the cost of travel and accommodation to attend the conference. A 50% registration discount was also available to upstate and LI arts educators and NYC-based unaffiliated teaching artists.

Click here to see guidelines for Upstate NY Arts Educators Program.

Click here to see guidelines for NYC Teaching Artists Program.

Deadline (for both programs): JANUARY 5, 2017.

Face to Face 2017: Keynote Speakers

Face to Face 2017Schedule and Breakout Sessions | NYSCA Face to Face Regrant Program 2017

 

Kevin Coval

Kevin Coval is a poet and community builder. As the artistic director of Young Chicago Authors, founder of Louder Than A Bomb: The Chicago Youth Poetry Festival, and professor at the University of Illinois-Chicago—where he teaches hip-hop aesthetics—he’s mentored thousands of young writers, artists, and musicians.
He is the author and editor of 10 books, including The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop and Schtick, and co-author of the play, This is Modern Art. His work has appeared in Poetry Magazine, The Drunken Boat, Chicago Tribune, CNN, Fake Shore Drive, Huffington Post, and four seasons of HBO’s Def Poetry Jam. Coval’s forthcoming collection, A People’s History of Chicago drops in April 2017 on Haymarket Books
.

Robert Blackson

Robert Blackson is Director of Temple Contemporary at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. Temple Contemporary is a research and public programs initiative whose mission is to re-imagine the social function of art. This singular purpose foregrounds curatorial accountability, reciprocity and exchange, as the basis of Temple Contemporary’s social life, and by extension our social values. For over ten years Blackson has worked internationally to configure his curatorial positions within higher education as a generative opportunity for addressing issues of local relevance and international significance. Previously, he has served in the UK as curator of contemporary art and public programs at BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Nottingham Contemporary and The University of Sunderland’s Reg Vardy Gallery. His writings have appeared in numerous monographs and journals including Art Journal, Labyrint, and Cabinet. He is a graduate of Rhode Island School of Design and Bard College’s Center for Curatorial Studies.

Joseph Conyers

Joseph H. Conyers was appointed assistant principal bassist of the Philadelphia Orchestra in 2010. He joined the Philadelphia Orchestra after tenures with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Grand Rapids Symphony (MI) where he served as principal bass, and Santa Fe Opera (NM). Described by the Grand Rapids Press as “a lyrical musician who plays with authenticity that transcends mere technique,” Conyers, a 2nd prize winner of the Sphinx Competition, has performed with many orchestras as soloist including the Grand Rapids Symphony, Richmond Symphony, Alabama Symphony, and the Savannah Philharmonic. A recent addition to the artist roster of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Conyers has performed as chamber musician internationally in numerous prestigious chamber music festivals.  A recipient of many awards and honors including, most recently, the inaugural Young Alumni Award from his alma mater, The Curtis Institute of Music, Conyers studied with both Hal Robinson, principal bass of the Philadelphia Orchestra, and double bass soloist, Edgar Meyer.  Conyers has been featured in Ebony Magazine (2007), a Mutual of Omaha commercial (2010-2011), and Pilot #3 for NPR’s From the Top (1999).  He serves on the double bass faculty of Temple University and has given masterclasses and seminars across the country from the Colburn School to Yale University to the University of Georgia.
A formidable advocate for music education, Conyers is Executive Director and a founding member of Project 440 – an organization that uses music as a teaching tool to develop tomorrow’s civic minded and entrepreneurial leaders.  Additionally, Conyers is the newly appointed Music Director of the famed All City Orchestra of Philadelphia. All City Orchestra showcases the best young musicians of the School District of Philadelphia.  Project 440, which serves as the lead program enrichment partner for All City, works extensively with the 400 + students of the program (includes band and choir) providing its curriculum in college and career preparedness, entrepreneurial and leadership training, as well as community and engagement and interactive performance.  Conyers has served on the board of directors of The American String Teachers Association, the Board of Overseers for the Curtis Institute of Music, and is currently on the National Advisory Board for the Atlanta Music Project (GA).

Monica O. Montgomery

Monica O. Montgomery is curator and founding director of the Museum of Impact (MOI) the first mobile social justice museum, inspiring action at the intersection of self, society art and activism. She leads the museum in working with communities to interrogate contemporary and historic social movements and solutions.  MOI is touring #UpstanderLoveLetters, an artful intervention showcasing local leaders, celebrity champions and everyday change makers that are taking a stand for what they believe in. Participants learn about active citizenship and strategies to ‘Stand Up. Speak Up. Act Up’ for what they believe in. MOI crowdsourcing community definitions of who an Upstander can be; harvesting letters, stories and actions we all can take to better our world.

Museum of Impact is chronicling movements of the people, having produced over 15+ exhibit pop ups and events around the country with renowned institutions like Brooklyn Museum, Newark Open Doors Festival, The New School, Naturally Occurring Cultural Districts NY, Marymount Manhattan College, Arts & Democracy, the High Line and CTRL + ALT Culture Lab and Columbia University Teachers College.

 

Face to Face 2017: Schedule and Breakout

Face to Face 2017 | Keynote Speakers | NYSCA Face to Face Regrant Program 2017

Session room location information is provided at the conference and on our Guidebook App.
PLEASE NOTE THAT BREAKFAST AND LUNCH ARE PROVIDED BOTH DAYS.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

8:30 AM-9:30 AM:  Registration, Breakfast, Networking, Materials Display (2nd Floor)
9:30 AM-10:00 AM:  Welcome/Opening Remarks
Kati Koerner, Roundtable Co-Chair; Theodore Wiprud, Roundtable Co-Chair; Mary Erina Driscoll, Interim Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, The City College of New York
Performance by members of The Dream Unfinished Orchestra

10:15 AM-11:45 AM:  SESSION I    

A. Positive Classroom Management Techniques for Teaching Artists, Part I

Erin Maxon, Education Director, Giverny Petitmermet, Artistic Director, The New Collectives
This two-part workshop* offers teaching artists the tools to work more effectively with young people. Facilitator Erin Maxon, Education Director of The Young Collectives, translates established behavior management systems for the specific needs of the arts in education classroom. The workshop will include hands-on practice, activities, and readings that can be applied in classrooms immediately. Recommended for teaching artists in any art form working with students age 5 to 14.
*Workshops  are designed as a sequence; attendance at both is strongly recommended.

B. Storytelling and Puppetry for Early Childhood

Lauren Jost, Artistic Director, Susanna Brock, Education Manager, Emily Baldwin, Outreach Coordinator, Spellbound Theatre
Early childhood learners have a diverse range of developmental, social, and creative abilities and interests. Join Spellbound Theatre, New York’s only theatre company exclusively for ages 0-5, as we explore how to use storytelling and puppetry for community, family, and school groups that address the needs and abilities of this unique age group. Create your own puppets and storytelling activities with Spellbound artists to explore the applications of arts education in family and pre-k programming.

C. Program Slam: Strategic Tune-Up for Organizations and Individuals

Jordan Dann, Education Director, Javan Howard, Teaching Artist, Teachers & Writers Collaborative
This workshop is for arts administrators and individuals who want to learn or have a refresher on strategic alignment. The day-to-day work of arts administration can often leave us responding to the immediate needs of our stakeholders, and it can be easy to lose sight of the bigger picture. In this workshop we will take a bird’s eye view of our work and offer one another a bit of strategic chiropractic alignment.

D. Full STEAM Ahead: Integrating Movement and Sound Theatre with Science Curriculum

Laine Barton, Teaching Artist, Nate Speare, Teaching Artist, Amy Appleton, Director of Education, Marquis Studios
In this dynamic STEAM workshop, participants will learn some strategies to assist students in learning science curriculum for early childhood and elementary classes. We’ll integrate movement, voice, and soundscape theater for science studies on weather, the seasons, forces in nature, environmental issues, and other science topics. We’ll also explore new ways of engaging the classroom teacher during the art process to create a truly collaborative residency.

E. Increasing Sector-Wide Access and Equity

Polly Kahn, Principal, PK Orchestra Solutions/PK Art Solutions; Daniel Berkowitz, Chief Strategy Officer, The Neubauer Family Foundation; Susan Feder, Program Officer for Performing Arts, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Anthony McGill, Principal Clarinet, New York Philharmonic
This session will increase awareness of local and national efforts to increase access and equity in higher education and Western classical music and to explore the implications for other sectors. This work is more marathon than sprint. No matter what role you play in your organization, how can you insure that both you and your organization are playing a part in ensuring that our wider artistic sector reflects the communities we serve?

F. Ableism and the Arts: How to Cultivate Inclusive Practices in Theatre Education

Jan Valle, Professor, The City College of New York; Lauren Kivowitz, Teaching Artist, Actionplay
This session focuses upon inclusive practices within theatre education contexts. Participants will have the opportunity to identify and reflect upon origins of potential fears, concerns, and/or anxieties about facilitating integrated groups of students with and without disabilities. The presenters will engage participants in a short theatre workshop in which inclusive strategies are modeled. A Q&A session will be offered following the workshop.

G. Designing and Implementing Arts Programming Through a Multi-Institutional Partnership 

Sarah Marcus, Director of Education, Mark Morris Dance Group; Jackie Chang, Director of Education, BRIC Arts Media; Amanda Hinkle, Director of Education, Irondale Ensemble Project
BRIC Arts, MMDG, and Irondale Ensemble Project will present Brooklyn Creative Arts Lab (BCAL) as a case study that shows how three well established cultural institutions each with their own history, mission, vision, and programming can come together to create shared and integrated programming that aligns with each organization equitably as well as showing how this opportunity can elevate each institution individually.

H. Meet-Up: Emerging Leaders

Kathleen Dorman, Facilitator
This group comprises those who have recently transitioned to a leadership position and are passionate about making a significant contribution to the field, but are still learning all that is required of them to succeed as leaders. Whether you are young in your career or a seasoned veteran in the field of arts in education, join us to discuss the exciting and challenging ways that increased responsibility and visibility shape your professional goals.
12:00 PM-12:10 PM:  All-Conference Art-Making Project Introduction:  Upstander Love Letters
Monica O. Montgomery, Founding Director and Curator, Museum of Impact
12:10 PM-1:00 PM:  Keynote Address
HIP-HOP IN THE CIVIC SPHERE
Kevin Coval, Poet, Community Builder, Educator
1:00 PM-2:00 PM:  Lunch

2:15 PM-3:45 PM:  SESSION II

A. Positive Classroom Management Techniques for Teaching Artists, Part II

Erin Maxon, Education Director, Giverny Petitmermet, Artistic Director, The New Collectives
This two-part workshop* offers teaching artists the tools to w– 3:45 PMork more effectively with young people. Facilitator Erin Maxon, Education Director of The Young Collectives, translates established behavior management systems for the specific needs of the arts in education classroom. The workshop will include hands-on practice, activities, and readings that can be applied in classrooms immediately. Recommended for teaching artists in any art form working with students age 5 to 14.
*Workshops  are designed as a sequence; attendance at both is recommended.

B. Dramatic Approach to Teaching Social and Emotional Skills in the Classroom

Rebecca Dolan, Programs Supervisor, Alicia Thompson, Senior Teaching Artist, ENACT, Inc.
Using drama therapy and theatre techniques to address the underlying feelings connected to challenging experiences, ENACT will model a signature role-play approach that creates parallel dramatic situations within a safe, contained group structure. The goal of this work is to explore painful affective states and identify and rehearse healthy coping mechanisms and self-regulation.

C. Engaging Technique with Contemporary Consciousness

Diana Crum, Dance Makers in the Schools Program Director, Movement Research; Clare Hammoor, Drama Specialist and Director, Blue School; Katy Pyle, Artistic Director, Ballez
As arts educators, we always bring the history, politics, and culture of our own practices into the classroom. How can we teach students skills with an awareness of both the traditional and the contemporary? Workshop participants will experience ballet and Ballez. They will use the experience to reflect on their own subjects and teaching methods.

D. Arts Professional Learning in New York City Department of Education Pre-K

Ben Espinosa, Arts Partnership Manager, NYC DOE Office of Arts and Special Projects; Stephania Krynytzky, Director of Curriculum and Policy Implementation, Division of Early Childhood Education, NYC DOE
Participants will engage in activities and discussion about high-quality arts education and professional learning in pre-K. Participants will learn about NYC Pre-K Create, a professional learning track developed by the NYCDOE, The 92Y/Dance Education Laboratory, Third Street Music School, The New Victory Theater, and Studio in a School. Participants will engage in a professional learning arts activity in dance, music, theater, or visual art and reflect on how the session topics connect with their own work.

E. National Meet-Up: A Multi-State Conversation About Arts Education Advocacy with Education Directors

Jessica Handrik, Director of Education, Flynn Center for the Performing Arts; Sonnet Takahisa, Deputy Director for Engagement & Innovation, Newark Museum of Art; Lauren Unbekant, Director of Education and Outreach, Syracuse Stage; Angelica Durrell, Founder and Artistic Director, INTAKE Organization, Inc., Stamford, CT
How are education directors from across the Northeast leveraging their role as community advocates for equity of access to arts education and for the development of local artist and teaching artist talent? What are the promising practices participants can adapt to their own contexts and ecosystems? In this leadership development and networking opportunity, participants will begin action plans to adapt the discussed practices and continue the dialogue with the nascent “national meet-up” created by the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable.

F. Creating Paths to Power: Quality Internships in Arts Administration 

Erika Atkins, Director of Operations, Opening Act; Lindsey Buller Maliekel, Director of Education/Public Engagement, The New Victory Theater
Does your organization have interns, but you’re just not sure if you’re utilizing them correctly? Are you looking for more efficient ways to recruit a diverse pool of candidates or make improvements to your current programs? Do you have a desire to create the next generation of arts administrators? Come join us as we identify the characteristics of an internship program that gives young professionals of varied backgrounds opportunities to grow into the next leaders of the arts administration field.

G. Meet-Up: Parents

Jennifer DiBella and Lisa Mitchell, Facilitators
The NYC Arts in Education Roundtable parents’ meet-up group is designed for arts educators who are also parents (both new and seasoned). This session will offer you a place to gather and discuss relevant issues and challenges. Share your child-care woes, stories of how you are managing a healthy work/life balance, secret parent resources, ideas for kid-friendly events, and more!

H. Post-Keynote Discussion and Workshop

Kevin Coval, Face to Face Keynote Speaker

4:00 PM-5:30 PM:  SESSION III

A. Games That Stick: Adding to Your Toolbox

Paul Brewster, Assistant Director of Education: Teaching & Learning, Roundabout Theatre Company; Renata Melillo Townsend, Assistant Director of Education/Public Engagement, The New Victory Theater
Games are so much more than a list of rules. Learning a new game is dependent on the facilitator’s style, tone, and energy. In this experiential exchange of games, participants will define the qualities of successful games and the reasons for using them in arts education settings. Then, a structured game share will promote exchange among our community with the hope of participants leaving with new games to adapt and implement in their own work.

B. Jazz Tools for Embracing Diversity and Cultivating Compassion

Eli Yamin, Managing and Artistic Director, Shireen Dickson, Dance and Development Director, The Jazz Drama Program
Jazz was created by the juxtaposition of East and West and gives space for individual expression while providing a foundation of groove and community that encourages working together for a common goal. This workshop gives participants tools to bring jazz across the curriculum in music, dance, and theatre as well as any place you need to increase listening, creativity, mutual understanding, trust, and appreciation.

C. Supporting Transitions: Including and Engaging Adults with Autism and Developmental Differences

Aliza Greenberg, Project Leader, Supporting Transitions — Museum Access Consortium; Miranda Appelbaum, Assistant Director, Accessibility and Guest Services, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts; Dara Cohen-Vasquez, Senior Manager of School Programs and Outreach, The Jewish Museum; Samantha Schott, Assistant Manager of Gallery Programs, The Jewish Museum (former Manager of Access and Community Education, El Museo del Barrio)
Adults with autism and other developmental differences make up a significant part of our population; they are however significantly underrepresented in our cultural institutions ¬ as visitors, audiences, artists, educators, and employees. This panel will discuss ways that cultural organizations and arts educators can support this population in engaging with the arts and build pathways for participation. Participants will hear from successful programs that support young adults and adults with autism as they transition from school to the larger world.

D. Creating Original Theatre That Has Form and Content

Joey Schultz, Associate Program Director of CAT Youth Theatre, Creative Arts Team of CUNY
When young people first create theatre, it can be easy to mimic the naturalism seen on television and in movies. How do we support them to analyze the everyday, situate it in a larger world context, and then turn that into something theatrically interesting? Through a series of practical activities used by CAT Youth Theatre touching on form and content, session attendees will explore this question, and identify discoveries as well as potential challenges.

E. One Year Later: A Federal Update on the Every Student Succeeds Act (and How the Arts Are Impacted)

Dr. Jennifer Katona, Director, Graduate Program in Educational Theatre, The City College of New York; Jeff M. Poulin, Arts Education Program Manager, Americans for the Arts
The reauthorization of ESEA —  the new Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) — offers new possibilities for arts education administrators regarding programming and funding opportunities. Join this session to learn more about the new language, STEM to STEAM, Title I, and teacher professional development.

F. Image, Sound, and Story: Classroom Teacher as Creative Collaborator

Sarah O’Hare, Manager of School Programs, Brady Shoemaker, Director of Curriculum, Jacob Burns Film Center
This engaging session will highlight the JBFC’s groundbreaking work in redefining literacy for a visual culture through its P-12 media arts curriculum, Image, Sound, and Story. Participants will hear first-hand from classroom teachers how JBFC is implementing this program in classrooms throughout New York City and enjoy a space to brainstorm what roles classroom teachers play in making and sustaining the connection and assimilation of authentic arts-integrated content.

G. Open Studio for Teens: Crafting Exploratory Drop-In Spaces for Youth in the Museum

Dyeemah Simmons, Assistant to Teen Programs, Francheska Rivera, Youth Insights Leader, Whitney Museum of American Art
In this interactive art-making workshop led by a Whitney staff member and Youth Insights Leader, we will examine our free drop-in teen program: Open Studio for Teens and discuss the challenges and benefits of maintaining teen-only exploratory spaces within a larger institution. We will engage in a discussion of strategies that have been employed and suggestions for development at the Whitney and implementation at other institutions. Get ready to think critically and make some art!

H. African Dance in the Classroom: Understanding Cultural Traditions and Community Through Dance

Pat Hall and Pam Patrick, Teaching Artists, Brooklyn Academy of Music
African and Diaspora dance forms celebrate every aspect of life and living – they provide a mirror into the culture, history and traditions of the people. In this Interactive workshop, participants will be introduced to the BAM AfricanDanceBeat model for teaching African dance in the classroom using song, narratives and dance-making techniques. More than an experience of teaching, this session will help build an understanding of what African dance teaches us about culture, history, and community.

I. Meet-Up: Teaching Artists

Erika Atkins and Rachel Evans, Facilitators
Designed for teaching artists at varied levels in the arts-in-education field, this group will consider how to approach teaching during a time of great political division and transition in our country. Teaching artists will walk away with action steps for tackling tough issues in the classroom and within the organizations they work for.
5:45 PM-7:00 PM:  Reception at NAC Faculty Dining Room
Relax, socialize, network!
Thursday, April 13, 2017
8:30 AM-9:15 AM:  Registration and Breakfast

9:30 AM-11:00 AM:  Session IV

A. Confronting Privilege in our Communities, Part I

Dr. Jennifer Katona, Director, Graduate Program in Educational Theatre, The City College of New York; Ashley Herring, Performing Arts Educator, Blackyard
As arts educators, we serve and work with a diverse array of people; a fact that has implications for our work. In whatever community and capacity you work, the concepts of privilege and power play an essential role. In this interactive workshop, we will explore these concepts as they relate to our personal journey as arts educators who are committed to increasing opportunity and access to the arts for all students.

B. On Your Feet! Using Traditional Dance in the Classroom

Gabrielle M. Hamilton, Director of Education and Public Programs, Flushing Town Hall (FTH); Abha Roy, FTH Teaching Artist, Director of Srijdan Dance Center; Alberto Lopez, FTH Teaching Artist, Artistic Director of Calpulli Mexican Dance Company; Ling Tang, FTH Teaching Artist, UNESCO International Dance Council
UNESCO safeguards traditional dances as representative of Intangible Cultural Heritage, passed from one generation to the next, constantly being refined by their current environment. Folk and traditional dance education allows immigrant students to express their cultural identity while educating students in history, culture, and immigration patterns of countries and communities. In this session, we’ll explore the diversity of dance in New York City, drawing connections to curriculum and dance with tradition bearers from India, Mexico, and China.

C. The Board/Staff Dynamic: Building and Maintaining Productive Relationships

Polly Kahn, Principal, PK Art Solutions/PK Orchestra Solutions; Julie Rulyak Steinberg, Executive Director, Jeffrey Schlosser, Board Chair, Turtle Bay Music School; Jennifer DiBella, Director of Education, Maureen A. Hayes, Board Member, Roundabout Theatre Company
This session is intended for executive directors, senior staff, and board members. Attending as board/staff teams is not required but will increase the session’s value. With guidance from experienced board/staff teams, we will explore areas that can interfere with good communication, and develop practical strategies for insuring ongoing, candid, respectful relationships that benefit programs and support your work. Whether you are struggling in this area or enjoy highly productive relationships, this session can increase your collective effectiveness!

D. 2016 New York State Arts Standards Revisions: An Overview

Nelle Stokes, Executive Director, Magic Box; Susan Koff, Dance Educator, New York University; Karen Rosner, Director of Visual Arts, NYC DOE Office of Arts and Special Projects
The adoption of new standards demonstrates New York State’s understanding that the arts are essential for a well-rounded and complete education, and contribute to student achievement. Members of the NYS Arts Standards Steering Committee from across the disciplines will share an in-depth look at the standards, the timeline for rollout, and strategies for alignment with local and national benchmarks.

E. Creative Aging 101, or So You Want to Work with Older Adults?

Philip A. Alexander, Arts in Education Director, Brooklyn Arts Council; Julie Kline, Program Manager, Kate Bell, Teaching Artist, Elders Share the Arts
This interactive panel is intended for teaching artists and program managers who are interested in the growing demographic of people over 60 but have little or no training with this demographic. Through a series of discussion prompts, attendees and panelists will address key elements of arts education programs for older adults. The panel includes professionals who have worked with elder populations in assorted settings in and around New York City. We’ll also provide some essential references as takeaways.

F. Caregivers and Their Meaningful Role in the Classroom

Kelsey Allison, School Director, Sarah Marcus, Director of Education, Mark Morris Dance Group
This interactive workshop will explore successful classroom structures, activities, and supports that lead caregivers to take an active role in both inclusive and special education classrooms. As participants move through a five-part creative dance class, relevant resources are presented for teaching artists of multiple disciplines and classroom environments.

G. Collective Impact Research:  Understanding Socio-emotional Development through the Arts

Dr. Dennie Palmer Wolf, Principal, WolfBrown; Gary Padmore, Director of Education and Community Programs, Eun Lee, Manager of Youth Programs, Orchestra of St. Luke’s
This session is a deep dive into collective impact research focused on learning how to measure socio-emotional learning thoughtfully; collaborative strategies for tool development; drawing implications from data; and asking data-based questions about best practices in arts learning. The core example is instrumental learning, but the approaches and lessons are widely applicable.

H. Paying for Professionalism: Trends in Teaching Artist Compensation and Work Structures

Lauren Jost, Artistic Director, Spellbound Theatre; David Marquis, Executive Director, Marquis Studios; Penelope McCourty, Teaching Artist
In 2016, over 150 NYC Teaching Artists were surveyed about their employment structures and compensation. Together they reported on over 275 individual teaching artist jobs. This session will review the results of this survey, (demographics and work life of the respondents, average pay rates and annual income, and the differences in compensation as they relate to discipline, experience, gender, race, and venue). We will examine how this information relates to our work as artists/administrators and set goals for continuing teaching artist professionalization.
I. Meet-Up: Early Career Professionals
Rachel Friedman, Facilitator
This meet-up group is aimed toward individuals who are in the first steps of their career. We will discuss our professional journeys, how to gain the skills needed for our current and future career goals, and other relevant and interesting topics in the arts-in-education field. This is time to meet with arts education professionals to create a peer group who can be a resource and support as you navigate your career path.
11:15 AM-12:30 PM:  Keynote Address
REFLECTIONS ON A BROKEN ORCHESTRA
Robert Blackson, Director of Exhibitions and Public Programs, Tyler School of Art, Temple University; Joseph Conyers, Assistant Principal Bass, The Philadelphia Orchestra, and Executive Director, Project 440
12:30 PM-1:30 PM:  Lunch

1:45 PM-3:15 PM:  Session V

A. Confronting Privilege in Our Communities, Part II

Dr. Jennifer Katona, Director, Graduate Program in Educational Theatre, The City College of New York; Ashley Herring, Performing Arts Educator, Blackyard
As arts educators, we serve and work with a diverse array of people, a fact that has implications for our work. In whatever community and capacity you work the concepts of privilege and power play an essential role. In this interactive workshop, we will explore these concepts as they relate to our personal journey as arts educators who are committed to increasing opportunity and access to the arts for all students.

B. Musical Theatre and Young Performers: Accessible, Low-Risk, and Efficient Auditions

Sarah Kenny, Manager, Education and Outreach, Lauren Chapman, Resident Teaching Artist/Manager of Teaching & Learning, Rachel Lee, Teaching Artist/Teaching & Learning Coordinator, Disney Theatrical Group
In this active workshop, Disney Theatrical Group’s Education team will share their low-risk approach to musical theatre auditions with young performers. Participants will experience first-hand the “Three-Line Audition Technique” that allows performers of any age and experience to feel successful and engaged and provides an efficient tool for educators to audition students. Participants can expect to participate in musical theatre activities and walk away with new strategies for auditioning and rehearsing a musical!

C. Better Together: How an Inclusive Arts Residency Can Demystify Disability and Foster Community

Maya Turner Singh, Director of Professional Development, Hiromi Niizeki, Master Teaching Artist, Marquis Studios
In this hands on workshop, learn about The Inclusion Project, a unique residency that partners a District 75 school and a General Education school that are co-located in the same building. Collaborating in an arts residency, students and teachers from both schools have the opportunity to build relationships that strengthen school culture. Engage in the full arc of this residency to understand key strategies in bringing these two populations together through the transformative experience of making art.

D. From Participant to Expert: Teens Take Agency in Their Learning Experiences in Out-of-School Programs

Keonna Hendrick, Teen Reviewers and Critics Program Manager, Amanda Guest, Student Art Program Manager, ArtsConnection; Katy Rogers, Programs Director, Dedalus Foundation
Explore how art educators create opportunities for teens to take agency in their learning experiences. Teen participants and educators from ArtsConnection’s Teens Curate Teens and the Dedalus Foundation’s art making programs discuss shared authority and teen agency in out-of-school arts education programming and the impact of their experiences on their academic and personal lives. Collaborate with peers and teens to identify strategies and attitudes for allowing teens to take more control of their learning experience.

E. Sustaining the Artist in the Teaching Artist

Ellen Hagan, Department Director, Poetry & Theatre; Moriah Carlson, Department Director, Visual Art & Maker; Lisa Green, Department Director, Dance & Music, DreamYard Project
How is self care a radical act? How as educators and artists do we sustain ourselves mentally, physically, and creatively in and among toxic environments? This workshop will focus on the ways in which movement, writing, and visual art can be forms of personal and collective healing. Recognizing the need for hope and healing can in itself be a form of social change.

F. Finding Our Groove: Exploring Group Dynamics Through Rhythmic Composition

Chris Gross and Justin Hines, Teaching Artists, New York Philharmonic
In this hands-on workshop, participants will explore the challenges and opportunities of group composition through the vehicle of creating complex rhythms. Active music-making will enable examination of group dynamics, differentiated instruction, and ways to stimulate individual creativity.

G. Beyond the Five Boroughs: Making the Case for Arts Education Funding Outside of NYC

Christine Leahy, Arts Education Program Director, New York State Council on the Arts; Cynnie Gaasch, Executive Director, Young Audiences of Western New York (Buffalo); Saul Maneiro, Program Officer, Rochester Area Community Foundation (Rochester); Andrew Marietta, Regional Manager, Central New York Office, New York Council on Nonprofits (Oneonta)
This session will explore the challenges and opportunities in seeking financial support for arts education programs in areas outside of New York City. A panel including representatives from regional and State funders, a nonprofit consultant, and an arts education organization with a successful fundraising track record will engage in a conversation with participants. Panelists will provide insight on how nonprofits can best tell the story of their work and its impact in their communities and will examine how these narratives can help strengthen an organization’s funding base.

H. Meet-Up: Senior Staff

Michelle López and Mitch Mattson, Facilitators
Designed for senior level staff from the arts in education field, this session will give space to hear from each other about pain-points and success-stories. Topics like leading courageously, supporting staff, and finding balance will guide our discussions. We’ll use the knowledge in the room and connect with our colleagues from organizations across the city.

I. Post-Keynote Discussion

Robert Blackson and Joseph Conyers, Face to Face Conference Keynoters
3:30 PM-4:00 PM:  Performance/Closing Remarks
Performance of Upstander Love Letters
Monica O. Montgomery and Tunu Thom, Museum of Impact
Concluding Remarks
Kati Koerner and Theodore Wiprud, Roundtable Co-chairs

Face to Face `17

Learn through monthly membership programs and events. Network with educators, administrators, and leaders in the field. Access up-to-date arts education resources. Propose and present a session at our annual Face to Face conference. Exchange ideas at Face to Face Participate as a committee member or on our Board of Directors

Face to Face 2016 Session Handouts and Materials

Presenters have posted session handouts and other materials here for your easy access.

The Center for Arts Education Parent Advocacy Toolkit

Arts Education Parent Advocacy Toolkit is Now Available!  The Center for Arts Education recently released the Arts Education Parent Advocacy Toolkit with plenty of great tips and strategies for parents, educators, and community members, to help expand arts education at public schools across the city. Download and view the kit at ArtsEdToolKit.org.

Session II. F: Discovering the Capacity and Resources Within: Valuing the Experience of the Teaching Artist

Click here to see Joan Mitchel Foundation Curriculum Resource Guide.

Click here to see Joan Mitchell Foundation: Discovering the Capacity & Resources Within: Valuing the Experience of the Teaching Artist

III. C: Learning Through Feedback: Making Assessment a Core Routine of Practice

National-Level Example: NCAS Cornerstone Assessment

District-Level Example: Arts Achieve Website: http://www.artsachieve.org/process/
Program-Level Example: Lincoln Center Theater LEAD Rubric

IV F: Work Sample Videos: The Why and the How

Sample student release form

PowerPoint handout

Session V.  E: Contemplate, Investigate, Collaborate, Create! Movement, Sound, Narrative, and Visual Art as a Way of Responding to and Making Art

Click here for image: The Great Wave Off Kanagawa, and contextual material.

Face to Face 2016 Schedule & Breakout Sessions 2016

FACE TO FACE 2016 SESSIONS

Session room location information is provided at the conference and on our Guidebook App. (See user’s guide)

PLEASE NOTE THAT BREAKFAST AND LUNCH ARE PROVIDED BOTH DAYS

Making Art Together – all-conference art installation – 2nd floor main hallway until 1:45 on Thursday.

WEDNESDAY, 4/27

Registration/breakfast: 8:30 – 9:30

Welcome/Opening Remarks

Student Short Film Screenings

Session I.  10:15 – 11:45 AM

a. Going Up and Away: Creating Theater for Young People on the Autism Spectrum, Part 1 (Lincoln Center Education)

Jonathan Shmidt Chapman, Artistic Director, Trusty Sidekick Theater Company/Associate Director of Programming and Production, Lincoln Center Education; Drew Petersen, Associate Artistic Director, Aliza Greenberg, Autism and Education Specialist, Robert Stevenson, Artistic Associate, Trusty Sidekick Theater Company

In 2015, Lincoln Center Education and Trusty Sidekick Theater Company premiered UP AND AWAY, an original immersive piece of theater designed specifically for young people on the autism spectrum. Using this experience as a case study, members of the creative team offer strategies for engaging students on the spectrum using theater, and offer ways that these techniques can enhance arts-learning for an under-served population.

b. We Gotta Stay Fresh: Learning to Build an Engaging, Exciting, Relevant and Informative Curriculum  (Urban Arts Partnership)

James Miles, Fresh Professor, Nick James, Curriculum Designer for Fresh Ed, Michael Wiggins, Director of Education, Jamel Mims, Fresh Prep Manager, Urban Arts Partnership

Participants will be taken through the process of building a year-long plan for arts integrated instruction in an ELA and Social Studies classroom. This professional development workshop will introduce the necessary elements of a Fresh Curriculum (youth culture, growth mindset, student/teacher roles, Common Core, SEL, Visual Inquiry Activities, Vygotsky’s Processes, Performance Assessment, and Art Form) and how to put those elements together to build a firm, yet easily adaptable structure of implementation.

c. From the Classroom to the Capitol: Current Trends in Arts and Education Advocacy and Policy (The Center for Arts Education)

Doug Israel, Director of Research and Policy, The Center for Arts Education; Alex Sarian, Director of Business Development, Lincoln Center Education; Jeff Poulin, Arts Education Program Coordinator, Americans for the Arts; Jessica Diaz, Program Director, Broadway Bound Kids

This session will explore current trends in arts and education policy and reflect on the role of advocacy in expanding access to arts education. Panelists will discuss burgeoning arts education initiatives underway in the New York, Chicago, and districts across the nation, as well as federal and state policy efforts that may impact arts instruction. Participants will be asked to join a discussion on how to capitalize on this growing momentum to expand access in their communities.

d. Perception: Interception (Dreamyard)

Moriah Carlson, Visual Arts Department Director, Lisa Green, Dance and Music Department Director, Ellen Hagan, Poetry and Theater Department Director, DreamYard Project

How do we see ourselves? How do others see us? What are the ways these perceptions hurt us? How can we subvert or change these perceptions? In this interactive workshop, participants will use a multidisciplinary approach (writing, visual art and movement) to investigate their own identity and how that fits into our communities, neighborhoods and societies. We will create art and open dialogue about how to subvert, challenge and eventually change these perceptions.

e. Evaluation, Assessment and Research 101: How to DIY (Carnegie Hall)

Elizabeth Ferguson, Manager of Community Programs, Tiffany Ortiz, Associate for Family Programs, Joseph Soucy, Manager of Artist Training Programs, Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute

We all want to understand the impact of our programs, in order to improve them and communicate their value to others. What are some DIY evaluation, assessment, and research tools that we can use ourselves, or when is it worth investing in paid evaluation with consultants? This workshop will introduce the world of evaluation, build on the knowledge of those in the room, and help you establish a simple plan to start using the tools shared in the workshop.

f. Identifying and Articulating Your Personal TA Philosophy (Lincoln Center Education)

Jean E. Taylor, Teaching Artist, John Holyoke, Assistant Director, Pre-K–12 and Higher Education, Lincoln Center Education

This session will help us as teaching artists actively connect with the WHY of our work. Our personal teaching artist philosophy can serve as a foundation and an inspiration, supporting excellence and sustainability in our work for multiple organizations. In this workshop we will explore examples from our individual body of teaching artist work, mining those examples for deeply held beliefs about arts, education, and the role of teaching artistry in schools and community settings.

g. Jazz Tools to Engage Creativity and Community (The Jazz Drama Program)

Shireen Dickson, Program Specialist, Eli Yamin, Artistic Director, The Jazz
Drama Program

Rooted in its work developing and producing original jazz musicals on socially relevant topics for children, The Jazz Drama Program’s methodology is rooted in multi-disciplinary collaboration, and achieving total group engagement. By exploring fundamental concepts like syncopation, poly-rhythm, sourcing story and making soulful sounds, participants will gain concrete tools to unleash the unique power and creativity of the jazz arts in multiple contexts.

h. Meet-up: Parents

Jennifer DiBella, Facilitator

The NYC Arts in Education Roundtable parents’ meet-up group is designed for arts educators who are also parents (both new and seasoned). This session will offer you a place to gather and discuss relevant issues and challenges. Share your child-care woes, stories of how you are managing a healthy work/life balance, secret parent resources, ideas for kid-friendly events, and much, much more!

12:00 – 12:10 PM  Tribute to Jessica Wilt

12:10 – 1:00 PM Keynote Address, Marc Bamuthi Joseph

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM – Lunch

Session II.  2:15 – 3:45 PM

a. Going Up and Away: Creating Theater for Young People on the Autism Spectrum, Part 2 (Lincoln Center Education)

Jonathan Shmidt Chapman, Artistic Director, Trusty Sidekick Theater Company/Associate Director of Programming and Production, Lincoln Center Education; Drew Petersen, Associate Artistic Director, Aliza Greenberg, Autism and Education Specialist, Robert Stevenson, Artistic Associate, Trusty Sidekick Theater Company

In 2015, Lincoln Center Education and Trusty Sidekick Theater Company premiered UP AND AWAY, an original immersive piece of theater designed specifically for young people on the autism spectrum. Using this experience as a case study, members of the creative team offer strategies for engaging students on the spectrum using theater, and offer ways that these techniques can enhance arts-learning for an under-served population.

b. Unpacking Unconscious Bias to Create Better Devised Theater, Part 1 (Opening Act)

Cathleen Carr, Program Director, Marcus Denard Johnson, Assistant Program Director, Opening Act

Drawing on social science theory and classroom practice, this two-part workshop will engage Teaching Artists in a discussion on how unconscious bias impacts a student’s ability to learn, create and feel safe in the workshop space. Through reflection, discussion and practice, participants will gain knowledge and practical strategies to facilitate a workshop space where student identities are respected and challenging subject matter can be courageously explored to create original theater. Participants are highly encouraged to attend both sessions.

c. Creating an Advocacy Plan that Works for You (The City College of New York)

Jennifer Katona, Director, Graduate Program in Educational Theatre, The City College of New York; Jeff Poulin, Arts Education Program Coordinator, Americans for the Arts

This session will offer attendees a primer on the current state of arts policy at the federal, state and local levels and then take attendees through the process of writing an individual advocacy plan that explores the ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ ask that directly impacts their day-to-day work in the arts and schools.

d. Making Performance Personal: Finding Yourself Onstage (Theatre Development Fund)

Ginger Meagher, Associate Education Director, Shelah Marie, Teaching Artist/Mix Tape Maker, Allie Relihan, Education and Community Programs Manager, Daniel Renner, Education Director, Theatre Development Fund

A replicable workshop model that allows teachers, teaching artists, educators and facilitators to take a group of individuals, guide them to see what they find valuable in a live performance, and creatively voice that response.

e. Working in the Classical Music Space: A Conversation for Program Administrators, Teaching Artists, and School Personnel (PK Orchestra Solutions/PK Arts Solutions)

Polly Kahn, Principal, PK Orchestra Solutions/PK Art Solutions

This session is a conversation among peers working in classical music –  including chamber and symphonic music, opera, youth orchestras, El-Sistema-inspired programs, and community music schools. Curated by the group, we will explore issues, perhaps unique to this genre, that are challenges for our work. What can we learn from one another that can make us more effective in our own institutions, and supportive of one another?

f. Discovering the Capacity and Resources Within: Valuing the Experience of the Teaching Artist (Joan Mitchell Foundation)

Travis Laughlin, Director of Art Education Program, Saul Chernick, Professional Development Program Manager, Antonia Perez, Peer Coach and Artist-Teacher, Joan Mitchell Foundation

Organizations often seek professional development from “outsiders” without fully examining the wealth of expertise held by their own teaching staff.  This session explores strategies for using staff as resources for professional development. Participants will examine their own organizational challenges and discuss ways to that teaching staff can be used to meet them. Learn how the Foundation incorporated the experiences and knowledge of Artist-Teachers into its professional development program through peer-led workshops, coaching, and curricular resources.

g. Likeability: Highlighting Your Identity on Social Media (The New Victory Theater)

Christopher Ritz-Totten, Public Relations Associate, Zack Ramadan, Digital Content Producer, The New Victory Theater

Social media presence has become increasingly crucial in promoting and elevating a brand. What does it mean to represent your identity successfully as an artist or arts organization on social media? What are best practices when it comes to telling your story and showcasing your artistic content? Participants will learn the importance of using social media thoughtfully and will devise sample content for four distinct digital platforms. Ready your smartphones!

h. Meet up: Teaching Artists

James Miles, Facilitator

Designed for teaching artists at varied levels in the arts-in-education field, this group will address concerns of professionalism, personal empowerment, work/life balance, and other associated issues. This session will look to address the different career paths possible for teaching artists and how one defines success.

Session III. 4:00 – 5:30 PM

a. Let’s Do the Partnership Dance!: How to Build Successful Teacher-Artist Collaborations that Evolve with the Years (92nd Street Y)

Carina Rubaja, Teaching Artist, 92nd Street Y; Michele Lambrech, Teacher, PS 278 Manhattan

A classroom teacher and a teaching artist will share the history of their partnership presenting 6 co-teaching models and showing them on video of their actual work. A creative movement experience will provide an opportunity to reflect on  the benefits and challenges of partnerships and deepen understanding on collaboration strategies in the planning, implementation and assessment phases  of partnerships as they evolve from novice to advanced. Participants will brainstorm applications to their own practice.

b. Unpacking Unconscious Bias to Create Better Devised Theater, Part 2 (Opening Act)

Cathleen Carr, Program Director, Marcus Denard Johnson, Assistant Program Director, Opening Act

Drawing on social science theory and classroom practice, this two-part workshop will engage Teaching Artists in a discussion on how unconscious bias impacts a student’s ability to learn, create and feel safe in the workshop space. Through reflection, discussion and practice, participants will gain knowledge and practical strategies to facilitate a workshop space where student identities are respected and challenging subject matter can be courageously explored to create original theater. Participants are strongly encouraged to attend both sessions.

c. Learning Through Feedback: Making Assessment a Core Routine of Practice

Don Glass, Arts Education Evaluation Consultant; Karen Rosner, Coordinator of Visual Arts, New York City Department of Education; Robert Sabol, Professor, Purdue University; Kati Koerner, Director of Education, Lincoln Center Theater

The learning sciences tell us that our brains are goal-directed, and that feedback is central to learning. This is as true for educators as it is for students. We all need focused and meaningful information about our effort and progress towards our artistic, academic, and non-cognitive goals. This panel will share recent development work on systems of arts assessment that are setting the stage for you to grow your assessment literacy and use.

d. Multidisciplinary Arts Learning: Opera in the Classroom (Opera America)

Leah D. Wilson, Director of Learning and Leadership, OPERA America; Stuart Holt, Director of School Programs and Community Engagement, Metropolitan Opera Guild

Discover a creative process that fuses drama, music and poetry to support K-12 student learning. From staging a scene based on literature to telling stories through music, opera can enliven classrooms and provide multiple entry points for learning. Experience first-hand how the multidisciplinary arts embodies 21st century skills, aligns with school-based standards, and easily connects to various curricula. With the latest research findings and resources from the field, learn how opera can support your arts education work.

e. Enrique’s Journey: Examining an Immigration Narrative with English Language Learners through Drama (Lincoln Center Theatre)

Alexandra López, Associate Director, Andrea Dishy, Education Projects Manager, Lincoln Center Theater Education Program; Margaret Mahoney, NYC DOE ESL/ELA Teacher, New World High School

In summer 2015, Lincoln Center Theater partnered with a Bronx ESL teacher using Enrique’s Journey–a non-fiction account of a Honduran youth’s harrowing journey to the US. Hear from the classroom teacher about how combining theater with language arts helped English Language Learners develop speaking skills and a deeper understanding of the text. Participants will experience learning through theater strategies that make the story accessible and invites students to connect personally with the theme.

f. Media Arts and the New Core Standards: Real-World Connections Between Cameras, Classrooms, and Curriculum (Magic Box Productions)

Nelle Stokes, Executive Director, Magic Box Productions

Nearly everyone has a camera in their phone, yet intentional media arts instruction is often missing from classrooms.  Media arts standards are a dynamic part of the voluntary national core arts standards and the NYC DOE Blueprints.  Learn how to  use the standards to support this real-world learning model for young people and make meaningful connections to a unique discipline.  Participants will gain practical strategies for incorporating media arts instruction within a variety of settings.

g. Resource Exchange: Cross-Organizational Collaboration to Support Teaching Artist Professional Development (Community-Word Project)

Patricia A. Chilsen, Program Director for Teaching Artist Training and Internships, Community-Word Project; Courtney J. Boddie, President of the Board of Directors, Association of Teaching Artists; Rajeeyah Finnie-Myers, Associate Director of Professional Development, DreamYard Project; Brooke Rogers, Education Director, Wingspan Arts

This dynamic panel of diverse organizations (Community-Word Project, Free Arts NYC, ATA, and DreamYard) will present four different models of TA Professional Development, including cross-organizational collaboration and sharing TA training resources to support Teaching Artist professional development and further the wider field of arts education/community arts. We will workshop new resource networks between participants, brainstorm challenges and creative solutions, and devise plans for further collaborations. Take-aways include draft plans, tips sheet, and inspiration from colleagues.

h. Meet-up: Emerging Leaders

Kathleen Dorman, Facilitator

This group comprises those who have recently transitioned to a leadership position and are passionate about making a significant contribution to the field, but are still learning all that is required of them to succeed as leaders. Whether you are young in your career or a seasoned veteran in the field of arts in education, join us to discuss the exciting and challenging ways that increased responsibility and visibility shape your professional goals.

5:45 – 7:00 PM – Reception at NAC Faculty Dining Room

THURSDAY, 4/28

8:30 – 9:15 Registration and Breakfast

Session IV.  9:30 – 11 AM

a. Restorative Arts Circles: A Creative Arts Approach to Restorative Practice in Schools (Counseling in Schools)

David Kener, Program Director, Kristen Brooks, Counselor, Wade Colwell-Sandoval, Counselor and Consultant, Karen Bagnini, Program Manager, Counseling in Schools

How does Restorative Practice and art-making create a safe place where opportunities for increased self-awareness, social and emotional engagement and relationship building thrive? Restorative Circles are rooted in the acknowledgment of our cultural realities and support the spirit of collaboration. Participants will use music, drama, storytelling and movement to develop emotional literacy, build community and promote healing through a restorative and artistic lens.

b. Youth Development through Student-Centered Music Education: An Examination of Assessment Practices Across Multiple Organizations (Amp Up NYC)

Bryan Powell, Director of Programs, Amp Up NYC; Ryan Zellner, National Program Director, Little Kids Rock; Lindsay Weiss, Senior Research Associate, Center for Arts Education Research at Teachers College

This session will review best practices in music education assessment through a review of assessment instruments created by the Center for Arts Education Research at Teachers College, Columbia University as well as The Child Mind Institute for use examining youth development and popular music programs in public schools.  Specifically, this session will explore the following metrics: Teacher Musical Development, Teacher Non-Musical Development, Youth Musical Development, and Youth Non-Musical Development.

c. Answering the Call! Responding to Proposals for Partnership (Marquis Studios)

David Marquis, Executive Director, Erica Rooney, Visual Arts Teaching Artist and Creative Arts Therapist, Susan Gonzalez, Visual Arts Teaching Artist, Marquis Studios; Susanne Bifano, Visual Arts Teaching Artist

We love and want to partner! How do we decide where and when to pursue partnerships? In this panel, participants will examine a partnership between Marquis Studios/VSA-NYC and Arts for All Initiative in Sudan. We will deconstruct the process of building a partnership with a community abroad and what the potential benefits and challenges are. Participants will devise their own strategies to respond to a community call within their own context.

d. Moving Beyond “I Have a Dream” (Teaching Artists Group & CCNY)

Michael Wiggins, Teaching Artist, Teaching Artist Group; Sobha Kavanakudiyil, Faculty, Graduate Program in Educational Theatre, The City College of New York

How can we move beyond just talking about the dream of a diverse society to taking specific action steps to achieve equity and justice? This workshop is for arts educators and administrators who want to take positive action intentionally to bring more people of color, women, members of the LGBTQ community, and people with disabilities into positions of power and agency within the field of arts education.

e. Fundamental Practices in Creating Space for Authentic Collaboration Towards Making Original Work (Brooklyn Arts Exchange)

Donna Costello, Education Programs Consultant, Lucia Scheckner, Education Director, Brooklyn Arts Exchange

Establishing an open and trusting environment is essential to a healthy learning environment. It is the facilitator’s role to create and hold this space so that collaboration and creativity can flourish. Through activities and discussion this workshop will make connections to the daily rituals of the class and the art making we strive to engage in with young performing artists. We will identify four best teaching practices and apply these strategies to the spaces we facilitate.

f. Work Sample Videos: The Why and the How (NYC Arts In Education Roundtable)

Jennifer Clarke, Managing Director, NYC Arts in Education Roundtable; Nelle Stokes, Executive Director, Magic Box Productions; Christine Leahy, Arts Program Director: Arts Education and Facilities Programs, New York State Council on the Arts

Arts education organizations submit brief videos of their work to the New York State Council on the Arts and other funders each year in a highly competitive grant application process. Does your video effectively demonstrate how teaching artists and students interact and how the classroom session impacts learning? Does it capture the uniqueness of your program? In this session, a representative from NYSCA and videographer Nelle Stokes will share insights and tips through sample screening, discussion, and hands-on activity.

g. Meet-up: Senior Staff

Philip Alexander, Facilitator

Designed for mid-career professionals in the arts in education field who have achieved senior levels in their respective organizations, this group will address concerns of professional mobility, personal empowerment, work/life balance, and other associated issues. More than a kvetching circle, we’ll discuss how we might shape the arts in education field as current and future leaders and as those who support up-and-coming leaders.

11:15 – 12:30 PM Keynote Address, Scott Barry Kaufman

12:30 – 1:30 – Lunch, Book Signing

Session V. 1:45 – 3:15 PM

a. Arts on the Margins: Working with Court-Involved and Homeless Populations (Manhattan Theatre Club)

David Shookhoff, Director of Education, Manhattan Theatre Club; Thomas Cabaniss, Music Educator; Kai Fierle-Hedrick, Director of Programs and Community Partnerships, Free Arts NYC

Providing high-quality arts programs and instruction to incarcerated and homeless populations presents unique administrative, logistical, and pedagogical challenges.  Three practitioners representing three art forms will discuss how they have addressed these challenges and will share strategies and practices that can help ensure meaningful and engaging arts experiences for youth and families in difficult circumstances.

b. Everyone Can Dance! Pursuing Artistic Excellence with Children with Disabilities (National Dance Institute)

Aileen Barry, Program Director, Kay Gayner, Director of NDI/China Project, National Dance Institute; Agnes McConlogue Ferro, Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, Stony Brook University

NDI’s DREAM Project (Dancers Realizing Excellence through Arts and Movement) pairs children with disabilities with typically developing peers in an innovative, partnership- and performance-based dance class. Our interactive workshop will explore a variety of ways to engage students of all abilities, encourage teamwork, and create theme-based choreography that highlights all dancers. Participants will gain skills and confidence to create choreography for diverse populations and explore how these techniques translate to their own work.

c. Recognizing Unconscious Bias and Reconsidering Cultural Relevance (Sugarhill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling)

Jennifer Ifil-Ryan, Associate Director, Education and Community Engagement, Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling; Claudia Dishon, Manager of School Programs, The Queens Museum

In an era where community needs are recognized as a driving factor for arts programming, educators and facilitators need to consider how to design programs that are relevant to the people they serve. This workshop challenges participants to unearth some of their own unconscious biases and consider ways to develop culturally relevant curricula.

d. Write On with Song (TADA!)

Rod Christensen, Director of Education, Stacey Bone-Gleason, Kimberly Hale, and Robby Stamper, Teaching Artists, TADA! Youth Theater

Using elements of musical theater this workshop will demonstrate how facilitators (e.g., classroom teachers/teaching artists) can use techniques to co-create original work with grades 4-8. The workshop will focus on how to: 1) engage students in the development of a story (script) based on an assigned theme, and 2) explore and then implement one of three techniques used to co-create original work that supports creative writing, dramatic devices and/or musical play.

e. Contemplate, Investigate, Collaborate, Create! Movement, Sound, Narrative, and Visual Art as a Way of Responding to and Making Art (Symphony Space)

Madeline Cohen, Education Director, Regina Larkin, Manager of Education Programs, Symphony Space

Why take a workshop in a discipline you don’t work or teach in? It can help you understand a new work of art. You can see your own art form with more clarity.  It can put the demonstrated pedagogy in higher relief.  And . . . . it’s fun!  You’ll work in “art-diverse” groups to explore one work of art.  That exploration will result in a new work of art. CCLS and other skills will be highlighted.

f. What’s Your Generation’s Story? 

Rachel Evans, Teaching Artist; Julie Kline, Artistic Associate, Roots & Branches

Young people and seniors often don’t find the time to connect outside of family gatherings. This can lead to misunderstandings and stereotyping between the generations. Creative collaboration between generations aims to debunk these myths, and builds connections and understanding. In this interactive workshop, participants will engage in activities designed for a group of seniors and young people to do together. Afterwards, participants will reflect on the experience and facilitators will share best practices, challenges, and how to implement similar programs.

g. Deep Impact: How the Performing Arts Reach Kids (The New Victory Theater)

Ben Weber, Education Programs Associate, Erica Reinsch and Carolyn Charpie Fagan, Education Programs Managers, The New Victory Theater; Dr. Dennie Palmer Wolf, Principal, WolfBrown

How can we assess the impact of the arts on students beyond the traditional metrics of test scores, grades, and attendance? In this workshop, participants will become familiar with the ways in which The New Victory Theater is currently investigating the intrinsic impact of the arts on students through the lens of the following constructs: Feel, Relate, Learn, Create.  Attendees will participate in a model pre-show workshop to identify these constructs in action.

h. Meet-up: Junior Staff

Rachel Friedman, Facilitator

This meet-up group is aimed toward individuals who are in the first portion of their careers. We will discuss our professional journeys, how to gain the skills needed for our current and future career goals, and other relevant and interesting topics in the arts-in-education field.

3:30 – 4:15 PM Closing

Display of All-Conference Art Installation

Student Short Film Screening

Closing Remarks by Laurie Cumbo, NYC Council Member, District 35 (Brooklyn)

Face to Face 2016 Jessica Wilt Memorial Fellowship

In Memoriam and Tribute to Jessica Wilt

Jessica Wilt was an inspiration and a mentor to many students and educators. She helped bridge the divide between local and national advocacy efforts. For that reason, the New York City Arts in Education Roundtable will establish a fellowship to honor her legacy.

The Jessica Wilt Memorial Fellowship will provide an emerging dance educator with the unique opportunity to participate in professional development opportunities in New York City and around the country and to serve as a resource to others by sharing those experiences through social media channels.

Further details of the Jessica Wilt Memorial Fellowship will be announced soon.

Click here to see full tribute.