Category: Arts NYC schools

NYC DOE Summer Rising – Murals & Pop-up Performance Grants

Office of Arts & Special Projects

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 4, 2021
CONTACT: Audrey Cox, ACox16@schools.nyc.gov

 

Dear Arts Partner,

The Office of Arts and Special Projects is pleased to announce summer 2021 Murals & Pop-up Performance Grants, sponsored by the Department of Cultural Affairs and the City Cultural Aid. These grants will provide $25,000 School Allocation Memorandum (SAM) funding to grantee Summer Rising sites to build partnerships that culminate in a co-created mural or a co-created pop-up performance at the end of summer 2021. Program goals include investment in school facilities and communities through talented NYC teaching artists while developing, implementing, and promoting best practices in arts education.

This application is only available to school sites participating in 2021 Summer Rising. School leaders are only allowed to submit the Murals & Pop-up Performance Grant application. Applications are due by Tuesday, May 25, 2021.

As New York City begins to recover and rebuild, we know the Murals and Pop-up Performance Grant will play a pivotal role in realizing this artistic renaissance. The Murals and Pop-up Performance Grant will create opportunities for teaching artists and school communities to redefine celebrating the arts in New York City Schools.

It is important to reiterate that schools are the grantees, so please follow-up directly with potential partnership schools. For more information regarding Summer Rising, please visit the Summer Rising webpage.

Please contact Audrey Cox at ACox16@schools.nyc.gov for inquiries.

Best wishes for a safe and creative summer!

In partnership, 

Audrey Cox

Director of Arts Partnerships

Office of Arts and Special Projects

New York City Department of Education

Acox16@schools.nyc.gov

A RECOVERY FOR ALL OF US: MAYOR DE BLASIO, CHANCELLOR PORTER, DYCD COMMISSIONER CHONG ANNOUNCE INNOVATIVE SUMMER RISING PLAN

Published April 13, 2021

Press Release from:

THE CITY OF NEW YORK

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR

NEW YORK, NY 10007

 

NEW YORK—Mayor Bill de Blasio, Schools Chancellor Meisha Porter and Department of Youth & Community Development (DYCD) Commissioner Bill Chong today announced Summer Rising, the City’s free, summer plan for any child in grades K-12 who wants to participate. For the first time ever, the City will use the Community Schools strategy to integrate the New York City Department of Education’s (NYCDOE’s) academic supports and DYCD’s school-based enrichment programming to create a comprehensive summer program during the most critical summer for New York City students. Summer Rising will be student-centered, experiential, academically rigorous and culturally responsive and sustaining.        

Applications for in-person K-8 programs will open on Monday, April 26, and families can sign up through the discover DYCD website. Kindergarten and elementary school students will participate in a five-day a week program for seven weeks, providing critical childcare services for families as they return to the workplace. Students with 12-month IEPs will participate in a five-day a week program for six weeks. Middle school students will participate in a four-day a week program for six weeks, and high school students will participate in a five week program with tailored scheduling to meet their needs. In addition, high school students will have the opportunity to engage in the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) and participate in the Public Schools Athletic League. Schools will begin outreach to families of high school students in the coming weeks to confirm participation. Students attending for promotion purposes will be in the same program as students participating for enrichment.  

“Our kids have been through so much, and they need our support as we build a recovery for all of us,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio. “This is a free program for all New York City students, combining academics and cultural enrichment for the best summer yet.”  

“This summer is pivotal for our school communities, and we have created a summer experience unlike anything we have ever done before to bring our students back stronger than ever. Summer Rising will be a holistic experience that combines the power of strong academic supports, social emotional learning and enrichment programming,” said Schools Chancellor Meisha Porter. “Through this innovative partnership with DYCD and our trusted community partners, and thanks to our heroic principals, teachers and staff, we’ll be able to serve any New York City student who wants to attend in-person so they can receive the comprehensive supports they need during this critical time.”  

“Summer Rising is truly the best of both worlds: bringing together for the first time the strengths of DYCD-funded summer enrichment initiatives and DOE’s academic programs into a singular experience for young people, particularly those from communities hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. DYCD and our network of community providers are excited to join DOE in keeping classrooms open this summer for safe learning, childcare, connection, and fun,” said DYCD Commissioner Bill Chong.    

Summer Rising will address immediate academic and social emotional needs of children and youth across the City. Planned and operated collaboratively by school principals and trusted community-based organizations (CBOs), programs for students in grades K-8 will be available citywide including tailored support for those who need academic support and students with disabilities. These programs will provide a bridge to next school year and allow students to re-connect with one another and with their schools, to ensure continued learning, and provide avenues for recreation, exploration, and fun. High school students will have access to academic and social emotional supports designed locally to meet the unique needs of older students.    

Summer locations will be available in every borough, with nearly half of all DOE school buildings serving students citywide. All programs will follow rigorous health and safety protocols and have access to testing, nursing support and a telehealth call center. In addition, Situation Room policies and protocols will be followed.    

All K-8 students participating in programs will have access to academic classes, enrichment programming including field trips, arts activities and outdoor recreation, and will engage in daily social emotional learning activities.      

All programs will be free, in-person, and run in four time frames:    

·       Students in grades K-5 will participate in summer programming from July 6 to August 20. Students will engage five days a week, receiving academic support, engaging in social emotional learning activities, and participating in enrichment programming.     

·       Students with 12-month IEP services will participate in summer programming from July 2 to August 13, five days a week. They will receive instruction and related services based on their IEPs, as well as enrichment programming.    

·       Students in grades 6-8 will participate in summer programming from July 6 to August 12. Students will engage four days a week, receiving academic support, engaging in social emotional learning activities, and participating in enrichment programming.    

·       Students in grades 9-12 who have a Course in Progress, or who need to retake a course they failed in a prior term, will participate in academic instruction from July 6 to August 13. High school students will also have the opportunity to accelerate learning, and access social emotional supports and arts programming. Similar to prior years, high school students will continue to have the opportunity to participate in the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP).    

There will be remote programming available for interested families whose children are mandated for summer learning or have a 12-month IEP. Program offerings for high school students will depend on school community need and may include a mix of in-person and remote options.   

Consistent with years prior, schools will notify families by June if their student is required to participate in summer learning and will share additional details with families about how they can enroll. These students will participate together in the same Summer Rising programs as those students not mandated to attend.  

In line with previous policy and practice, grade promotion decisions are based on a holistic review of a student’s progress toward meeting the standards for their grade level. Teachers will review multiple pieces of student work in English language arts and math to make these decisions. State test scores will not be a factor in whether a student is promoted. If a school requires a student to attend summer learning, their promotion to the next grade is contingent on demonstrating sufficient progress in their summer learning.

“It is crucial that we connect every child from every zip code with summer enrichment programming that not only addresses COVID-19 academic setbacks, but that supports the whole child. Our children deserve summer programs that meet the needs of all students and that are centered on providing children and their families with wraparound support services including social and emotional supports and childcare, coupled with fun, active learning instruction emphasizing the arts, music, recreation, and field trips. Summer Rising will remove barriers to learning to enable meaningful connections, and an ability to meet the holistic needs of children and their families,” said Council Member Mark Treyger, Chair of the Committee on Education.  

*****

COVID-19 Impact Survey: Help Us Advocate for Arts Education in NYC

Text: Arts Are Essential.

Published on April 5, 2021

As the main convening body for NYC’s arts in education community, the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable is committed to serving our membership and field at-large through advocacy with government officials and policymakers. To help us support the field of arts education in NYC, we kindly request member and non-members organizations complete our COVID-19 Impact Survey. Your response will help us:

  • Advocate for funding for arts education in the New York City FY 2022 budget;
  • Communicate with funders, City Council Members, and key stakeholders on the state of arts education in NYC;
  • Measure the impact of COVID-19 on the capacity of arts organizations to provide effective and meaningful arts education programming;
  • Provide transparency for the field via a comprehensive report to be released by Summer 2021.

Please submit ONE survey response per organization (your organization may remain anonymous). This survey should take approximately 30-35 minutes to complete. We recommend having the following information accessible when completing this survey:

  • Size of Teaching Artist Roster (2019-2020 & 2020-2021)
  • Estimated Number of Partner Schools (2020-2021)
  • Number of Students Served (2019-2020 & 2020-2021)
  • Funding Breakdown for Arts Education Programs (2019-2020 & 2020-2021)

Thank you for your time and consideration! Your responses are greatly valued and will help the Roundtable advocate for our field. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to Kimberly Olsen at kolsen@nycaieroundtable.org with any questions.

Please submit your survey response by Friday, May 28, 2021.

Create your own user feedback survey

The Roundtable on WNYC Radio: The Impact of Covid on NYC Schools Arts Education Programs

Roundtable Executive Director Kimberly Olsen and members including teaching artist Marissa Ontiveros and Michelle Kotler of Community Word Project were recently featured on WNYC Radio. The interview focused on the impact of COVID-19 on arts education programs in NYC public schools. Almost 80% of teaching artists were furloughed or laid off due to the impact of COVID-19, extremely limiting access to arts education for our city’s youth. The interview shares more insight into how the lives of students and teaching artists have been affected by the pandemic and the ways that teaching artists have been able to cope during these times. Listen to the interview here (5 Minutes):

https://www.wnyc.org/story/other-covid-symptom-struggling-arts-programs-public-schools/

Latest Memo from NYC Department of Education’s Office of Arts and Special Projects (June 24, 2020)

Updates from OASP, NYC Department of Education. Pictured: NYC Department of Education and Office of Arts and Special Projects logos.

Posted on Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Earlier today, the NYC Department of Education’s Office of Arts and Special Projects shared the attached memo with the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable regarding Arts Partnership Grants 2020-2021 (including Arts for English Language Learners/ Students with Disabilities and Arts and Family Engagement Grants).

As it relates to our community’s ongoing advocacy work, the memo states:

“Due to the unprecedented impact of Covid-19, we regret to inform you that the Arts Partnership Grants will not be renewed for 2020-2021. This is devastating news as we know the tremendous impact The Arts for English Language Learners & Students with Disabilities and Arts+Family Engagement grants has had on students, their families, school communities and arts partner organizations. We have always had a vision of supporting sustainability in grants, so we encourage partners and schools to discuss possibilities for continued collaboration within the school’s existing resources. However, we know this is a challenging fiscal climate, and this news will have an impact on arts education partnerships.”

For questions about Arts Partnership Grants, please reach out to Audrey Cox, Director of Arts Partnerships at ACox16@schools.nyc.gov. For any other questions, please reach out to ArtsAndSpecialProjects@schools.nyc.gov.

 


Additional Information

As our community continues to advocate via the “Arts Are Essential” campaign, the Roundtable wishes to share some additional history and context for this budget cut:

Chancellor Carranza Announces Record Citywide Investment in Arts Education

Published on Roundtable website on December 7, 2018

NEW YORK – Schools Chancellor Richard A. Carranza today released the 2017-18 annual Arts in Schools Report and announced a record $433 million citywide investment in arts education, up from $336 million at the start of this administration in 2013-14. The $97 million increase in annual citywide arts education spending includes school-based spending in addition to the administration’s annual $23 million investment to expand programming, renovate arts spaces, and hire new teachers, which began in the 2014-15 school year.

Other highlights from the 2017-18 Arts in Schools Report include:

  • A record 2,837 full-time certified arts teachers in New York City schools, representing an 18 percent increase from 2013-14
  • 100 percent of responding schools collaborating with one or more cultural partners, up from 84 percent in 2013-14, and including 431 cultural partners citywide
  • Investment in partnerships and grants to 369 schools to support arts education, including specific programming for Multilingual Learners and Students with Disabilities

“A rigorous and enriching arts education provides students with an outlet for their creativity and helps them develop key skills such as critical thinking and collaboration,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio. “We’re committed to prioritizing the arts across our 1,800 public schools to help our students achieve success in the classroom and beyond.”

“Growing up, the arts brought everyone in my family together. Music opened my eyes to culture and history, kept me grounded, and taught me how to stay focused on a goal,” said Schools Chancellor Richard A. Carranza. “The skills we learn in the arts apply well beyond chords and color palettes, and help so many of our students thrive in and out of the classroom. Whether our students pursue an art form into college and careers, or it’s simply their favorite class of the week, I am proud that New York City is investing in high-quality arts education for all students.”

Under this administration, New York City has increased the number of full-time certified arts teachers citywide by 444, representing an 18 percent increase in the number of full-time certified arts teachers over the last five years. In 2017-18, the DOE had 2,837 full-time teachers serving students in PK-12, up from 2,770 in the previous year, and up from 2,393 in 2013-14.

For the first time in 2017-18, 100 percent of responding schools – 1,491 schools – reported working with one or more cultural partners, up from 84 percent in 2013-14. New York City schools partner with 431 cultural organizations citywide, bringing professional artists into schools to conduct workshops and exhibitions, and expose students to world-class performances.

The DOE continues to advance equity for Multilingual Learners and students with disabilities through partnerships grants, including Arts for English Language Learners and Students with Disabilities, Arts Continuum, and the Arts + Families Engagement program. These grants grew to serve 369 schools in 2017-18 – with approximately 200 arts organizations providing services – up from 144 schools when the grants launched in 2014-15. Additionally, in 2017-18, the DOE released the Arts and Students with Disabilities Online Resource Compendium(Open external link), a resource on best practices for educating students with disabilities in the arts classroom. Additional training using this resource is available throughout the 2018-19 school year.

The 2017-18 Arts in Schools Report also highlights a number of new and expanded arts initiatives that are reaching students across all five boroughs: family engagement activities including Borough Art Festivals and High School Audition and Application Workshops, and additional professional development for arts educators. In summer 2018, the DOE served 252 students through the Middle School Arts Audition Boot Camp, up from 98 in July 2014. Sponsored by the DOE and hosted by Lincoln Center Education, the Audition Boot Camp provides intensive support and targeted training to students auditioning for and applying to arts-based high schools in New York City. The program works to level the playing field by helping students from Title I middle schools prepare for auditions at competitive arts high schools.

“As Chair of the Assembly Education Committee, I would like to commend Mayor de Blasio and Chancellor Carranza for making this great investment for our students,” said Assembly Member Catherine Nolan, Chair of the Assembly’s Education Committee. “Arts education is so important in helping young New Yorkers to discover their talents, enhance their skills and enrich their lives. Expansion of the arts has been a priority of the Assembly majority, and I thank Speaker Heastie and my colleagues for all the state budget support for these initiatives.”

“An investment in arts education is an investment in the success of our students. Arts education improves our children’s cognitive abilities, including learning, attention, motivation and intelligence,” said State Senator José M. Serrano. “Studies have also shown the correlations between school-based arts instruction and high school graduation rates in New York City public schools. While there is still more work to do, I am heartened by the progress shown in this year’s Arts in Schools Report. As incoming Chair of the Senate Committee on Cultural Affairs, I look forward to working to ensure all of our students have access to a strong arts curriculum. I commend Chancellor Carranza for his commitment to providing our children with a well-rounded education.”

Together, the Equity and Excellence for All initiatives are building a pathway to success in college and careers for all students. Our schools are starting earlier – free, full-day, high-quality education for three-year-olds and four-year-olds through 3-K for All and Pre-K for All. They are strengthening foundational skills and instruction earlier – Universal Literacy so that every student is reading on grade level by the end of 2nd grade; and Algebra for All to improve elementary- and middle-school math instruction and ensure that all 8th graders have access to algebra. They are offering students more challenging, hands-on, college and career-aligned coursework – Computer Science for All brings 21st-century computer science instruction to every school, and AP for All will give all high school students access to at least five Advanced Placement courses. Along the way, they are giving students and families additional support through College Access for All, Single Shepherd, and investment in Community Schools. Efforts to create more diverse and inclusive classrooms, including Equity & Excellence for All: Diversity in New York City Public Schools are central to this pathway.

The 2017-18 Arts in Schools Report is available online.

Reposted from New York City Department of Education website.

Theater Master Workshop Invite from NYC DOE!

THE CHARACTER FORMULA: A Master Workshop with Larry Silverberg (11/1/2018)

LaGuardia High School’s LITTLE FLOWER THEATER

This is a truly special event on November 1.  I am thrilled to welcome Larry Silverberg, internationally renowned acting teacher and author, as he leads us through his transformative workshop The Character Formula. Subsidized tickets are $10.

Larry, who studied with Sandy Meisner and is an expert in his approach, explores the core human components of theatre, what he calls “the Human Map.” His session as has been described as a powerful path of aliveness, connection, and self-expression to impact one’s well being as well as one’s theater practice.

Hope you can join us for what promises to be an experiential evening designed to recharge as we look inwards as another step towards being responsive and supportive facilitators of our students bringing their passionate, whole, present and brave selves to any theater work.

  •  Location: Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School for Music & Art and  the Performing Arts (100 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY 10023)
  • Date: November 1, 2018
  • Time: 6:00PM – 8:00PM
  • Cost: Special subsidized fee of $10 per person
  • TO REGISTER: Please visit https://www.trueactinginstitute.com/character

**BOOK EARLY AS SPACE IS LIMITED  AND FEEL FREE TO SHARE THIS OFFER WITH A GUEST**

Instrument Drive Changes Students Lives

Two years ago, WQXR held their first Instrument Drive with the goal of reaching 1,000 donated instruments to refurbish and distribute to music programs throughout NYC public schools. Little did they know, their goal would be surpassed by more than twice that, ending with over 2,500 donations within 10 days. Graham Parker, WQXR’s general manager, said he was surprised by the level of excitement behind the program. “I have been humbled by the personal stories that have accompanied many of the donations,” he said. “It becomes very real for people to think of their once-used instrument making its way into the hands of a student who can create new memories.” (1) This year, WQXR is launching its second drive from April 8-17, 2016, with the goal of collecting 6,000 instruments.

Many NYC public schools lack music programs, and the ones with them are often lacking in instruments or are in need of repair. The 2014 NYC State of the Arts reported that “from 2006 to 2013, there has been a 47 percent decline in arts programming funding and an even steeper decline in dedicated support for supplies such as musical instruments and other equipment, according to the comptroller’s report.” (2) Even though music and other arts have been proven to improve academics, they are always in danger of being lost due to budget cuts. “Children who study a musical instrument are more likely to excel in all of their studies, work better in teams, have enhanced critical thinking skills, stay in school, and pursue further education.” (3)

With the help of WQXR and thousands of generous donors, these instruments will be refurbished and distributed to students in NYC and Newark under-resourced music programs beginning in the fall of 2016. Teachers and administrators can also submit an application for their school to be considered to receive instruments.

Donate your used instrument and change a student’s life! Vsit giveinstruments.org/about to learn more and spread the word using #GiveMusicNYC.

 

Sources:
1. http://www.wqxr.org/#!/series/wqxr-musical-instrument-drive/
2. http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2014/04/07/report-finds-state-of-the-arts-at-nyc-public-schools-lacking-in-lower-income-neighborhoods/
3. https://www.dosomething.org/facts/11-facts-about-music-education

How do I explain what I do? By Yusef Miller for the Roundtable Teaching Artists Affairs Committee

  

            Um, I teach.

            Um, I’m a teacher. But not really?

            I’m an Actor. I work for Arts Education Organizations….What do I DO?

            Um, I’m called a Teaching Artist. A Theatre Teaching Artist.

Okay, I’ll give you the CV one-sentence summary.

I am an advocate for programming that utilizes theatre arts to help achieve literacy and educational objectives within youth populations.

But, that doesn’t really explain what I do. The truth is – I am finding my way. From this finding-my-way place, I have found myself in a system. This system claims to educate young people. This education is supposed to give them direction – school to college to career. But from street to class – they are harassed – presumed to be criminally minded – as they are bagged-checked and body frisked and in some case, manhandled by security – this is their entry to learning. Meanwhile, their Black and Latino families are stretched so far and so thin on a nation’s apathy. To come to school and be mishandled and unheard, students are like,

“Let me express myself, Ms. Let me take the whole class time for you to explore why I walk in late, why I’m eating in class, why I’m yelling back, why I’m speaking without raising my hand, why I need to take a break – to get out of your face, Ms. because you don’t understand that I don’t care what you know; I want to know if you CARE.”

I….I teach theatre as a tool of expression. I’m finding a way to connect to their content and modes of expression. It’s listening without judgment; it’s avoiding the urge to culturally critique. I’m finding a way to apply a theatrical lens to who they are and where they come from, FIRST. It’s like pulling teeth to ask them to tell a non-violent story or to imagine a delivery beyond the World Star videos. But, I’m finding a way to facilitate as community member, ally. Some times who I am appears to be an affront. I’m Black. Male. Educated. An Artist. I have expectations. AND I CARE. I’m never afraid to let them know I care. I’m never afraid to show them I care. I’m never afraid to speak to them frankly, familiarly, like nieces and nephews. I’m never afraid to buck the generational distance. I’m finding my way to impact using the skills I have. They reject what I know on some days. I’m finding varied ways to model the imagination at work. I want them to see the freedom one could gain from developing a character, a world, or rearticulating their circumstances for whatever purpose THEY choose.

I take a breath before delivering a monologue – I give them a thumb – one, two, three, the young audience is in no one’s syncopation. But I get it. I get them. I swallow. I begin my monologue. I hope I’m free enough to quell the side chatter – to ignite their risk taking. I am finding my way, knowing there is a way.

As flawed as that, I am a Theatre Teaching Artist and this is what I do. What do you do?

 

 

 

 

 

 

DOE Borough Arts Festivals Celebrate Student Arts

The Manhattan Borough Arts Festival at Symphony Space on June 1st was a true celebration of the arts in Manhattan’s public schools.

Thirteen different performances represented the incredible range of arts NYC school students are engaged in. Each performance spoke volumes of the energy, dedication, and hard work involved in bringing student arts to the stage.

From small groups of students performing with great focus to the highly polished ensembles coming from rigorous arts training programs, each performance was unique, creative, and satisfying. The high level of attention by students watching the performances was a testament to the level of performance and preparation for the event.

In his opening remarks, Paul King, Executive Director, Office of Arts and Special Projects, Department of Education, congratulated all our young artists and thanked Mayor De Blasio and Schools Chancellor Carmen Farina for their commitment to arts education.  Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer added that “nothing can be accomplished without a robust education in the arts,” and gave credit to the teachers and cultural organizations providing high quality arts education.

The Manhattan Borough Arts Festival is one of five events presented as part of new Department of Education initiatives to expand arts education citywide. A festival for Southern Brooklyn & Staten Island and another for Brooklyn were presented in May. Festivals in Queens and the Bronx were presented in early June.