Category: Advocacy

The Roundtable Announces “Empire State Creates: Teaching Artist-Led Activities for Everyone” Grant Opportunity funded by New York State Council on the Arts

Text in white against a royal blue background reads, "Empire State Creates: Teaching Artist-Led Activities for Everyone. $1500 Grants for the Creation of Asynchronous learning resources. Deadline to apply: May 21, 2021. Image also features the Roundtable and NYSCA logos.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 30, 2021
CONTACT: Kimberly Olsen, kolsen@nycaieroundtable.org

New York, NY – In partnership with the New York State Council on the Arts, the NYS Arts in Education Roundtable is proud to announce a new grant opportunity for teaching artists. “Empire State Creates: Teaching Artist-Led Activities for Everyone” is a pilot program seeking to support teaching artists and offer continued arts learning opportunities for New Yorkers of all ages through the development of asynchronous arts learning materials.

Empire State Creates will provide $1,500 grants to 15 independent New York State-based teaching artists to create 4-5 asynchronous arts learning resources for distribution in community settings including but not limited to students (3K – 12th grade), veterans, older adults (creative aging), people experiencing incarceration/Re-entry, people with disabilities, people from the LGBTQ+ Community, and multilingual learners. This project is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

“NYSCA is thrilled to partner with the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable to support both teaching artists and arts learners across New York. Teaching artists promote the power of arts to transform the mind and encourage lifelong learning,” said Mara Manus, NYSCA Executive Director. “This exciting opportunity will produce meaningful resources for asynchronous learning and aid teaching artists in their professional development after a tremendously challenging year.”

“We at the Roundtable believe Teaching artists are superheroes, with the unique power to facilitate arts experiences as both highly-specialized educators and artists,” says Kimberly Olsen, NYC Arts in Education Roundtable Executive Director. “We are thrilled to partner with NYSCA on this pilot project in hopes that we may further spotlight New York’s talented teaching artists and the vital services they provide in schools and communities.” 

These asynchronous arts learning materials may be video-based (no longer than 15 minutes each) or non-video based activities that connect to New York State Arts Learning Standards. Priority in selection will be given to content that embodies or is aligned with culturally responsive-sustaining pedagogy and social-emotional learning. Teaching artists are encouraged to watch a recording of the Empire State Creates Information Session, which took place on Wednesday, April 28 at 5pm.

Click here for PDF version of this press release.

About the New York City Arts in Education Roundtable
The New York City Arts in Education Roundtable improves, advances, and advocates for arts education in New York City. NYCAIER is a community of cultural organizations and educators that shares resources, provides professional development, and advocates for the needs of our constituents and the communities they serve. Founded in 1992, NYCAIER builds our efforts around the value that arts education is a right for all NYC students. NYCAIER produces a major annual arts in education conference, Face to Face; monthly professional development programs;  in addition to ongoing advocacy and communications efforts for cultural organizations and teaching artists in every discipline. For more information please visit: www.nycaieroundtable.org.

About the New York State Council on the Arts
The New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) is dedicated to preserving and expanding the rich and diverse cultural resources that are and will become the heritage of New York’s citizens.

At NYSCA, our efforts are guided by our belief in the fundamental importance of arts and cultural expression in people’s lives and a commitment to serving our three constituencies: artists, arts and cultural organizations, and the public. We believe that:

Artists are at the center of creative endeavor. Therefore, we are committed to providing artists with opportunities for artistic development and the public presentation of their work.

Strong arts and cultural organizations are vital to connecting the arts to people’s lives. We are committed to assisting a wide range of arts and cultural organizations – small and large, new and established – to achieve their artistic, programmatic, educational, community, and organizational goals.

Every citizen of New York State can have a meaningful connection to creativity and every community has a right to cultural self-determination. The Council is also committed to making the arts accessible to all the citizens of New York State. We aim to support worthy artistic and cultural activities that serve traditionally underserved communities or populations. These are the economically disadvantaged, people with disabilities, rural populations, and those who may experience discrimination on the basis of age, gender, ethnicity, culture, or sexual orientation. We are committed to fostering public understanding and enjoyment of arts and culture through support of arts education, public participation, and lifelong learning programs in schools and community settings for children and adults.

For more information please visit: https://arts.ny.gov/.

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COVID-19 Impact Survey: Help Us Advocate for Arts Education in NYC

Text: Arts Are Essential.

Published on April 5, 2021

As the main convening body for NYC’s arts in education community, the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable is committed to serving our membership and field at-large through advocacy with government officials and policymakers. To help us support the field of arts education in NYC, we kindly request member and non-members organizations complete our COVID-19 Impact Survey. Your response will help us:

  • Advocate for funding for arts education in the New York City FY 2022 budget;
  • Communicate with funders, City Council Members, and key stakeholders on the state of arts education in NYC;
  • Measure the impact of COVID-19 on the capacity of arts organizations to provide effective and meaningful arts education programming;
  • Provide transparency for the field via a comprehensive report to be released by Summer 2021.

Please submit ONE survey response per organization (your organization may remain anonymous). This survey should take approximately 30-35 minutes to complete. We recommend having the following information accessible when completing this survey:

  • Size of Teaching Artist Roster (2019-2020 & 2020-2021)
  • Estimated Number of Partner Schools (2020-2021)
  • Number of Students Served (2019-2020 & 2020-2021)
  • Funding Breakdown for Arts Education Programs (2019-2020 & 2020-2021)

Thank you for your time and consideration! Your responses are greatly valued and will help the Roundtable advocate for our field. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to Kimberly Olsen at kolsen@nycaieroundtable.org with any questions.

Please submit your survey response by Friday, May 28, 2021.

Create your own user feedback survey

Live Testimony to Committee on Education (March 23, 2021)

Several boys smiling and pointing to the sky

Published on March 23, 2021

An abbreviated version of the following testimony was delivered by Kimberly Olsen, Executive Director

 

Thank you Chair Treyger and the Committee on Education for your leadership and commitment to arts education. My name is Kimberly Olsen, and I come to you as the Executive Director of the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable.

The Roundtable is a service organization who builds its efforts around the values that arts are essential and that arts education is a right for all NYC students. Our 120+ member organizations have worked in long-standing partnership with the DOE to ensure that every child has access to quality arts learning.

As our city begins to rebuild and envision a post-pandemic era, it’s imperative that we invest in arts education as part of the city’s recovery process. The long term impact of COVID-19 on students and schools will take years to understand. However, the trauma, systemic racism, and lost instructional times are stark realities that students now face every day as they enter the classroom. The need for investment and equity in arts education access comes when the need for arts in our schools has never been more clear.

Studies show that participation in arts education translate to the development of social-emotional learning skills, including self-management, self-discipline, and relationship building. Student participation in the arts also leads to higher levels of social tolerance and civic engagement.

Under the Every Student Succeeds Act, arts are listed as a core arts subject and a part of a well-rounded education. Even before the pandemic, principals consistently cited budget constraints as the chief obstacle to providing arts education at their schools. While schools receive Arts Supplemental Funding through Fair Student Funding each year (SCHOOL ALLOCATION MEMORANDUM NO. 02, FY 2021), as of 2007, principals are not required to spend these funds directly on arts education. Without targeted funding in place, many arts programs have remained bare bones or been eliminated entirely as more money is needed to make up for other budget shortfalls.

We understand the tremendous financial impact of COVID-19, yet the lack of investment in Arts Education has been recurrent. Prior to the pandemic, 67% of principals noted funding for the arts is generally insufficient according the Arts in Schools Report Raw Data. Now in the current school year:

  • 22% certified arts teachers are spending more than half their time teaching in other subject areas to accommodate remote learning
  • 70% of funding for arts education services has been cut, directly impacting arts partnerships that support Students with Disabilities and Multilingual Learners

New York City is missing the opportunity to invest in authentic ways to build long-term social emotional competencies of youth living through these traumatic times. The city is missing the chance to instill in our youth the power of imagination and creativity, which are needed in not only art-based professions but in a myriad of careers including engineers, educators, health care professionals, and computer software designers. And the NYC DOE is failing to engage community partners and teaching artists primed to expand student opportunity and advance equitable access to arts learning. 

New York City has a rich array of cultural resources, including cultural institutions and teaching artists that unfortunately only play an important role in the lives and education of some of our students. As students re-enter the school community, these 449+ organizations are ready to partner with schools to nurture the creation of a welcoming school environment where students can express themselves in a safe, positive way. Beyond budget implications, persistent payment delays and a current freeze on contract renewals are impeding program delivery, curriculum development, and professional development. Organizations that submitted MTAC contracts in 2019 are left in the dark about the status of their now-expiring contracts and grow increasingly concerned about the impact this will have on payment for services rendered. 

This school year, and every subsequent year, the arts will be key to re-igniting students’ learning in the post-COVID-19 era and preparing them for success and joy in a complicated 21st century world. With that in mind, we believe the city must:

  • Restore the 70% cut to arts education services, which directly supports partnerships between schools and cultural organizations;
  • Change the Arts Supplemental Funding thru Fair Student Funding SAM from a recommendation to a requirement;
  • Prioritize funding the Office of Arts & Special Projects Strategic Arts Plan to close the equity gap and address high-quality arts instruction for all students.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

*****

My Dearest Arts Organization, Are You Listening?

NYC Arts in Education Roundtable logo in black and orange.

Published on March 23, 2021

*****

Dear Friends,

This week GuildNotes published My Dearest Arts Organization, Are You Listening? a letter created by teaching artists to reflect on some of the challenges that they’ve faced during the multiple pandemics which have stricken the world.  The letter has been called a “breakup letter” because while teaching artists love the work, they often feel caught in a toxic relationship. In a time when equity and inclusion have become paramount, what does it mean when teaching artists want out of the field, when they are at the heart of the work?

We invite you to read the letter and consider:

  • What do I hear being said in the letter?
  • What resonates with me?
  • What can I do to change the power dynamic expressed?
  • Are teaching artists a priority in my organization?
  • Does my organization allow for honest critical feedback from TAs?
  • Does my organization have an accountability plan for feedback?
  • What do I want to know more about?

There is a follow-up checklist derived from the perspective of teaching artists as a guide to create a vibrant arts ecosystem that is equitable for all. We invite you to fill out the checklist and consider:

  • Which boxes can my organization check? Why/Why not?
  • What does my organization need to check every box?
  • What do I want to know more about?

We invite you to join a conversation where you can discuss your individual and organizational response to this article.  Together we can work to reimagine and rebuild this arts ecosystem so that it holds everyone.

In the fall leaders from multiple agencies* will collaborate on a series to address specific ways to carry out the checklist recommendations.

In solidarity,

Your colleagues at *Teaching Artists Guild, Teaching Artists of the Mid-Atlantic, National Guild for Community Arts Education, Lincoln Center Education, NYC Arts in Education Roundtable, New 42, and Community-Word Project

In Solidarity with our AAPI Communities

Published on March 18, 2021

*****

Dear Arts Education Community,

Violence is being done in New York City and around the country to our Asian, Asian-American, and Pacific Islander neighbors, from children to adults to elders. We recognize that these acts stem from our systems of white supremacy, which is embedded in our country’s founding. The NYC Arts in Education Roundtable is compelled to speak out on behalf of all these innocent victims.  

The Roundtable stands for equity in learning and creative expression, and for the right of all our artists and organizations to thrive. As artists and educators we condemn the senseless harm of anti-Asian violence and harassment, and the misinformation motivating recent attacks.  

All of us need to stand together for healing and to act against repression. We urge artists and educators to speak up against anti-Asian attacks.  For those looking to learn more, better understand how to be an ally, and help the AAPI community fight Anti-Asian Racism, we offer the following resources:

Information & Additional Reading

Toolkits & Allyship Resources

If you’re able, please join us in learning from and donating to the following organizations who are working towards racial justice:

Thank you to the Roundtable’s Non-Black POC Affinity Group who helped gather many of these resources.  The Roundtable will be holding space for communal care and support for AAPI arts educators and accomplices who desire to work towards systemic change. Registration information and event details will be shared next week. 

Sincerely,

Sobha Kavanakudiyil, Board Co-Chair
Jennifer DiBella, Board Co-Chair
Gary Padmore, Board Vice Chair
Ted Wiprud, Acting Board Treasurer & Chair Emeritus
Erika Atkins, Board Secretary
Kimberly Olsen, Executive Director
NYC Arts in Education Roundtable

Live Testimony to Committee on Cultural Affairs, Libraries, & International Intergroup Relations (March 9, 2021)

Published on March 12, 2021

Delivered by Kimberly Olsen, Executive Director

 

Thank you Chair Van Bramer, Committee on Cultural Affairs, Libraries, and International Intergroup Relations, and Commissioner Casals and staff at DCLA for your leadership and commitment to arts education. My name is Kimberly Olsen. It’s a pleasure to hear from our colleagues in the public library system, as I began my career as a teaching artist teaching devised theater to middle schoolers at the Steinway branch of the Queens Public Library. I am now the Executive Director of the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable.

The Roundtable is a service organization who builds its efforts around the values that arts are essential and that arts education is a right for all NYC students. Our 120+ member organizations have worked in long-standing partnership with the DOE to ensure that every child has access to quality arts learning.

As our city begins to rebuild and envision a post-pandemic era, I am here to highlight the importance of investing in arts education as part of the city’s recovery process. The long term effects of COVID-19 on students and schools will take years to understand. However, the trauma, systemic racism, and learning loss related to COVID-19 are stark realities that students are currently facing every day as they enter the classroom. The need for investment and equity in arts education access comes when the need for arts in our schools has never been more clear.

New York City is missing the opportunity to invest in authentic ways to build social emotional competencies of youth living through these traumatic times. The city is missing the chance to instill in our youth the power of imagination and creativity, which are needed in not only art-based professions but in a myriad of careers including engineers, educators, health care professionals, and computer software designers. And the NYC DOE is failing to engage a workforce of thousands of artists primed to expand student opportunity and advance equitable access to arts learning (through cultural partnerships). This school year, and every subsequent year, the arts will be key to re-igniting students’ learning in the post-COVID-19 era and preparing them for success and joy in a complicated 21st century world.

To rebuild the cultural workforce and sustain arts education programs, we believe the city must restore 70% cuts to arts education services at the NYC DOE and restore cuts CASA programs in the FY22 budget.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Click here for a PDF version of NYCAIER’s Live Testimony.

Click here to view the full live Committee on Cultural Affairs, Libraries and International Intergroup Relations Hearing.

Meet Melissa Parke of Black Teaching Artist Lab

By Melissa Parke
Published on February 26, 2021

My name is Melissa Parke (she/her), and as Black Teaching Artist Lab (BTAL) Founder and Program Director, my sincerest hope is that by using art— one of the most powerful tools we have for human expression— Pan-African artists will be able to share their individual stories of the lived Black experience with Black students everywhere.

I am a Brooklyn-based artist and first began developing BTAL in the beginning of 2019. During that time, I was working as a community manager for the Brooklyn Creative League (BCL), a co-working space in Brooklyn, New York. Surrounded by social entrepreneurs at BCL, I was inspired to turn my big ideas into a tangible, new reality.

It was really great to be able to have a job to create a community for this demographic. It was cool to interact and build friendships with folks at BCL. They really encouraged me to pursue BTAL and offered great entrepreneurial insight. I am so fortunate to have had that opportunity.

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, I was ultimately laid off from BCL in early 2020. And that’s when I decided it was time to truly focus my energy on building BTAL.

At first, BTAL was called Black Teaching Exchange, and the premise of the program was to bring African American teaching artists to Ghana, in order to explore what American Black culture was. But with the onset of COVID, traveling abroad was no longer an option. So I had to think of ways in which I could bring something more localized to folks. During this time there were so many riots and conversations about race here in America that were happening and I felt that I needed to use this programming that I was developing in order to help move this conversation forward.

Black Teaching Artist Lab, LLC’s (BTAL) mission is to provide Black teaching artists with professional development and travel opportunities in order to become better equipped to teach Black learners and to better understand their own Black identities.

In response to the unmet needs of Black learners here in the United States, I also developed the Afrocentric Social-Emotional Learning framework in the early part of 2020. This framework seeks to help Black learners better understand their own Black identity, the emotions that are associated with being Black in America, and how to manage those emotions through art. The central tenet of the Afrocentric Social-Emotional Learning framework is best described by BTAL’s program associate, Abby Faires:

“We believe Afrocentric Social-Emotional Learning in the arts is a pedagogical framework that will equip Black learners and Black teaching artists to discover who they are (individually, culturally, spiritually); to express their own unique talents; and to uncover how they can serve humanity through their work.”

BTAL’s Afrocentric Social-Emotional Learning workshops are currently being conducted through Zoom and are led by either myself or lead facilitators of color who have been trained to utilize the framework.

Another major aspect of BTAL’s programming is the travel abroad experience (safely launching after the resolution of the global COVID-19 pandemic). The goal here is to have Black teaching artists from the U.S. (as of now) travel to other parts of the African Diaspora, in order to partake in an arts-based cultural exchange, using art to share the experiences of being Black in the U.S. and in other parts of the world.

Being Black in America is an experience that is met with multifaceted hurdles. In some regards, the history and current state of the treatment of Black people in the U.S. makes it difficult to be proud to be an American. However, despite the treatment we have faced, we have contributed to our country’s greatest achievements, both in and out of the arts. It is interesting to explore the Black experience outside of the U.S. and to discover the similarities and differences we share with individuals and cultures in other parts of the Diaspora. What I have found to be most profound is the rich, deep-rootedness to West African culture and tradition that imbues the Diaspora.

Currently, BTAL is working on traveling to Puerto Rico in 2022, with a mission to uplift the Afro-Boricua and community voices on the main island through art workshops.

So, why am I choosing teaching artists to carry out this work?

I believe that Black teaching artists are the social, emotional, and cultural responders for Black learners in the classroom. And by providing these teaching artists with a framework that helps them to better understand their Black identity and culture, as well as the Black identity of their learners through art, I believe we can begin to unlock a vital universal truth: we are all human beings, connected through the human experience.

Black Teaching Artist Lab, LLC (BTAL) strives to provide opportunities for Black teaching artists who are interested in using their own Black experience, identity, and art medium to help shape a more understanding world. To learn more about BTAL, please follow the organization on Instagram @blackteachingartistlab and on the BTAL website: www.blackteachingartistlab.com.

About Melissa
Melissa Parke is a Brooklyn-based creative that is making waves in the arts-education world. Parke initially developed her concept for Black Teaching Artist Lab, LLC at the beginning of 2019, while working as a community manager at Brooklyn Creative League—a co-working space in Brooklyn, New York. Surrounded by successful entrepreneurs and immersed in the social changes that were underway in America, Parke was inspired to turn her big ideas into a tangible, new reality.

URGENT ADVOCACY ALERT: New York City Council Schedules Hearing on Arts Education

Text: Arts Are Essential.

Posted on December 2, 2020

The following letter was sent out to the Roundtable mailing list on Wednesday, December 2, 2020. To stay up to date with weekly e-blasts about advocacy efforts, best practices, current trends, upcoming events, and more, please subscribe to the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable mailing list.

Scroll down for additional advocacy updates and information on ways to get involved in the #ArtsAreEssential campaign! For more information about the campaign, please click here. (more…)

Can’t Stop the Hustle: 4+ Ways for Teaching Artists to get Financial Relief

By Michelle Cole
Published on October 28, 2020

Covid-19 is messing with the Teaching Artist hustle.

Our profession thrives on togetherness and community. But right now, traveling artist-educators are considered safety risks solely because of the ubiquitous nature of our work. How are we supposed to do what we do during a time when separation is mandated? How can we hustle when it feels like our whole profession is on pause? It makes me wonder, are other Teaching Artists doing ok? Because I’m not. How will we survive this financially? I have suggestions.

Teaching Artists in all disciplines have been disproportionately affected by this pandemic. The range of pandemic adjustments varies for each artist, from reduced hours to course conversion to furloughs. Teaching Artists have had to find ways to pivot to make ends meet. For some, this may have amounted to a career change. For others, it may look like a reconfiguration of teaching practice to remain relevant and adapt to this changing world. No matter the situation, we must remember who we are. We are adaptable, flexible, resilient, and creative in more ways than one. Knowing to pivot when necessary is a part of our job description. Despite the many challenges, teaching artistry is still alive and it is even more vital than ever. What we provide for communities is invaluable. Now, more than ever, it is time to utilize this virtual realm to take advantage of the available financial resources to supplement reduced or lost income so we can continue to provide for our communities.

Money isn’t the only way we’re being affected. Our physical, mental, and emotional health are also negatively impacted. I lost over 75% of my income. I work out – I’ll say – less (does walking back and forth from the kitchen in my pajamas count?). And I am feeling much more isolated- as many people can attest to experiencing. Teaching Artists know how isolating this profession can be, so having gatherings halted, reduced, or completely shut down can be that much more of a strain on both our mental and emotional well-being. We’re going through national ongoing extended trauma that has seen people slipping in and out of depressions and experiencing both anxiety and rising stress levels. Couple that with financial strain to get a recipe for a full breakdown.

But, before the spiral begins, there are solutions! I know the struggle; I experienced it firsthand. If you’re like me and happen to be an artist parent, then your pockets are probably quickly depleting from ravenous children incessantly eating/snacking at home. Times are hard with kids in the house 24/7, curing their boredom with food. So, I asked for help, I sought assistance, and I looked through so many websites to find solutions. These kids have to eat. I am allowing myself to be more vulnerable than I have ever been because this is not the time for pride and ego trips.

Allow me to share what I gathered and please take advantage. There are many funds, grants, and microgrants out there to provide financial relief for artists to help us navigate this unprecedented time. Below you will find a compiled list of the most current and applicable opportunities for teaching artists. This list is not comprehensive of all available emergency funds, nor is this a cure-all. But this may be able to hold us over until we can figure out how to recreate some semblance of stability.

 

Financial Resources for Teaching Artists

(October 2020: List reflects resources available as of October 28, 2020)

Artist Relief Fund

This fund has gone through seven (7) cycles of funding for artists. Two cycles remain. See the dates below.

One time, $5000 unrestricted grant for artists in need of financial assistance due to Covid-19’s impact.
There are two more rounds of applications in 2020:
Cycle VIII: October 22 – November 18 (closes 11:59pm ET)
Cycle IX: November 19 – December 10 (closes 11:59pm ET)
Apply Here
Tip: During the application process, be sure to provide as much detail as possible regarding the impact of Covid-19 on your financial struggles. Save your answers to the questions in a separate document or an e-mail so you can apply again for the next round, in case you don’t get it.

Arts Administrators of Color Network (AAC)

This microgrant is ongoing. No specified end date.

$200 microgrant for US-based BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) artists and administrators

Apply Here
Tip: If you have a website, update it. If not, be sure to have a web link for your CV/résumé or a contract to show artistic engagement.

Red Bull Arts Microgrant

This application is open on a rolling basis. No specified end date.

$1000 microgrant for artists (and groups) 18+
Award is given to two (2) individuals each month.

Apply Here
Tip: Be detailed about both your ‘artist statement’ and ‘statement of purpose.’ Why do you need this grant money? How will you use it? Distinguish yourself from others. NYC is jam-packed with dope struggling artists.

Max’s Emergency Relief & Resource Fund

This application is open on a rolling basis. No specified end date.

A one-time grant of between $500-$1000 for a specific bill (housing, legal, medical)
Applicants should be self-employed artists who have a steady work history but experiencing a temporary financial setback.
Money is sent directly to the third party, not the individual.

Apply Here (Download Application)
Tip: Be specific about how you will use the awarded money. It is a requirement to send applications by snail mail. This application process is extensive.

Other Resources

The Arts in Education Roundtable has plenty of resources for artists such as financial assistance, professional development, emotional and mental well-being, and more. Click here to find out more about it on their resource page.

Also, check out the Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC), New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), and Craft Emergency Relief Fund (CERF+) for additional resources and other compiled lists.

I hope this helps to alleviate some of the financial stress. We may be experiencing financial hardship, but we’ll get through this together. Hopefully, this will further ignite Teaching Artists to advocacy so we can establish a union and better protect ourselves in the future. In the meantime, apply for what you can and share this with an artist friend-in-need. Many of these funds are also accepting donations, so if you are someone or know someone that has the means, please consider donating to a fund that supports Teaching Artists right now. We can really use it. Take care of yourself and remember who we are. The hustle will return.

Michelle smiles with reddish short sleeve shirt, close-cropped hair

Michelle Cole, is an educator, choreographer, and dancer. She received her Master’s degree in Dance Education from New York University, Steinhardt and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Florida International University’s Honors College. In 2019, she began her own dance teaching company, Dance Culture LLC, to conduct independent dance residencies at universities, public, private, and independent schools throughout NYC. Michelle became an adjunct faculty member of NYU in 2015, she currently teaches Afro-Caribbean and Hip-Hop Dance. As a choreographer and performer, Michelle has presented and performed in New York, Chicago, Miami, Martha’s Vineyard, Kampala, Uganda and more. She is a member of the Teaching Artist Affairs committee through the Arts in Education Roundtable and an advocate for dance education, social justice, dances of the African diaspora and culturally integrated dance pedagogy.

 

A Tribute to Paul King

Paul King with slight smile wearing glasses, brown blazer and blue collared shirt against a black background

Published September 24, 2020
(Originally shared September 16, 2020)

The New York City Arts in Education Roundtable presents a remembrance to a great friend to the Roundtable, Paul King, former Executive Director of the Office of Arts and Special Projects. This video was originally shared at The Roundtable’s Kickoff event, “Bridging the Divide: Making Connections Between Personal Impact and Communal Change.”