Face to Face Conference

Sessions

For more than 25 years, the Face to Face conference has enriched the arts education community by providing a space to share innovations and best practices. Sessions are presented by members of the field and curated by a panel of our peers with the expressed goal of expanding our understanding of and desire to provide the best possible arts experience to New Yorkers of all ages, in all boroughs.

The conference engages attendees in hands-on art making sessions in addition to discussions about vital issues that affect the field at large including research, assessment; evaluation; advocacy; and the need for equity, diversity, inclusion, and social justice within our schools and our organizations.

Scroll down to view the Conference Schedule and Session Information.

Face to Face Schedule

Directions: Click the “+” to see more information about conference workshops and panels.

Although many of the panels and workshops listed below are rooted in specific arts disciplines, they will all address issues of general concern. Confirmed presenters are listed below each session. Additional presenters to be announced.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

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Jennifer DiBella and Sobha Kavanakudiyil, Roundtable Co-Chairs
Chancellor Richard A. Carranza, New York City Department of Education
Others TBD

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A. A 360-Degree View of the Teaching Artist Audition Process
Kati Koerner, Hiltz Director of Education, Lincoln Center Theater; Courtney J. Boddie, Director of Education/School Engagement, The New Victory Theater; Jennifer DiBella, Director of Education, Roundabout Theater Company

This hands-on session for artists and program administrators will give participants a window into the teaching artist hiring processes of three major cultural institutions. Participants will take part in and evaluate sample audition activities and consider how best to showcase their teaching skills on an application or during an in-person audition. The session will also address the alignment of the teaching artist hiring process and institutional needs and values.

 

B. Creating Visionary Youth: Large Ensemble Improvisation and Young Musicians
Jeff Lederer and Jessica Jones, Co-Artistic Directors, Visionary Youth Orchestra, Arts for Art

The presenters will lead a workshop in large ensemble improvisation strategies, including conducting, visualization exercises, and the use of graphic scores and game pieces. The workshop will conclude with a demonstration by students from the Visionary Youth Orchestra and special guests.

 

C. How to Make Impact Evaluation Work for You
David Lavin, Founder and Director, Spark Impact; Aaron Siegel, Assistant Director of Learning and Engagement Programs, Carnegie Hall Weill Music Institute; Meredith Dean, Clinical Program Director, The Animation Project

Organizations of every size and capacity can integrate meaningful, doable, and affordable program assessment and evaluation into their processes in a way that serves institutional growth and learning. Learn from two organizations of contrasting size about how to manage and use an effective evaluation system, then hear an expert answer some of the burning questions from the field.

 

D. Redefining Power
Lucia Scheckner, Education Director, Donna Costello, Education Programs Consultant and Lead Facilitator, Angie Pittman, BAX Teaching Artist, Danielle “Dani” Criss, BAX Teaching Artist, Brooklyn Arts Exchange

Brooklyn Arts Exchange’s workshop invites participants to consider and question manifestations of white supremacist power structures within dominant teaching/learning practices. To explore antiracist models of teaching and learning, the workshop will follow an “unconference-model” of facilitation that embodies decentralized practices and resists the historically dominant “power-over” teaching/learning model. The BAX staff will share questions with which the BAX community is wrestling, including how to manifest power-within and power-with rather than power-over in class and studio environments. The workshop will be participant-driven and grow from the questions and experiences of those who take part. At the close of the workshop, facilitators will invite participants to make connections back to their own teaching environments. They will also introduce a working list of teaching/learning practices that they have cultivated in their ongoing antiracist arts education efforts at BAX.

 

E. The Art of Puppetry: Activating Student Artistry
Lauren Chapman, Manager of Teaching and Learning and Resident Teaching Artist, Rachel Lee, Teaching Artist Coordinator, Teaching and Learning, Disney Theatrical Group

Step into the role of artist and performer in Disney Theatrical Group’s Art of Puppetry workshop. Through an exploration of puppetry in The Lion King on Broadway, participants will discover how to distill high-level artistic concepts and turn them into a scaffolded and engaging lesson. Through experiential learning followed by reapplication, participants will explore how to incorporate this type of scaffolding into their own work to give students freedom to explore their potential as creators.

 

F. The Power of Performance in Early Childhood Dance
Jennifer Eisenberg, Master Teaching Artist, Jerome Korman, Music Director, Aileen Barry, Senior Director of Education and Outreach, National Dance Institute

In this experiential workshop, two teaching artists—a dancer/choreographer and a musician—will model a unique approach to intertwining process and performance for early elementary children. This process-oriented class is situated in a “performance context”—a framework in which students are deeply immersed in the creative process and also able to demonstrate mastery for the “audience” of peers, teacher, and the larger community.

 

G. Thinking Space/Drawing Space
Andrea Kantrowitz, Assistant Professor, SUNY New Paltz

This workshop offers a series of challenges that reveal multiple aspects of visuospatial reasoning, integrating functional, imaginative, and expressive approaches that can be applied in the classroom. Understanding, manipulating, and transforming 2- and 3-D objects in the world and our minds takes visuospatial reasoning. Research links spatial skills to success in a host of creative endeavors, including STEM disciplines as well as art and design fields. Participants will build spatial skills through drawing and paper folding (and unfolding).

 

H. Welcoming Environment: Transforming Spaces in Nontraditional Settings
Marcus D. Johnson, Director of Programs, Paul Gutkowski, District 79 Program Manager and Mentor Teaching Artist, Opening Act

How do we develop a “welcoming environment” in a space that might not be our own and is not conducive to creating? In this workshop, attendees will be able to define what a “welcoming environment” looks like within their organization and develop concrete practices to foster such an environment in any space, even outside of the traditional classroom setting.

 

I. Meet-Up: Emerging Leaders
Facilitators TBD

 

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Location: Shepard Hall, Great Hall & Room 250

Please note: Vegetarian, gluten-free, and kosher options (for those observing Passover) will be available.

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A. Learning in a Virtual Age: Technology as a Tool for Arts Education
Ilk Yasha, Ph.D, Studio Museum Institute Coordinator, The Studio Museum in Harlem; Bethany Tabor, Public Programs Associate, Pioneer Works, Red Hook, Brooklyn

How can technology and art practice enhance the learning experience? Technology can be a tool in arts education, giving students creative and functional insights into the world around them. Technology also has an artistic end—allowing people to ideate, create, revise, and design. In this panel discussion we will use cases studies at Pioneer Works in Red Hook to show how technology can help us think about civic and public space in the context of arts education.

 

B. Embracing the Change: Integrating Hip-Hop into Arts Education
Warren Gramm, Manager of Program Outreach, Kenrick Wagner, Hip-Hop Content Coordinator, Little Kids Rock; Toni Blackman, Hip-Hop Educator

Let’s embrace hip-hop in the classroom and see how it can be introduced and utilized in a positive way. This workshop will help administrators and teachers to get a better understanding of hip-hop music’s influential voice in education and to identify the positive artists, producers, and sounds. The session will introduce you to writing techniques and culture-building activities, and give you access to an array of artists, playlists, and songs that support a classroom-friendly learning environment.

 

C. Increasing Accessibility in Visual Art Education for People Who Are Blind or Low Vision
Gabriella Ziocki, Associate Coordinator, ArtAccess Program, Queens Museum; Lindsay “Londs” Reuter, Access Programs Coordinator, Brooklyn Museum; Chancey Fleet, Assistive Technology Coordinator, New York Public Library Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library

Professionals from Queens Museum, Brooklyn Museum, and Andrew Heiskell New York Public Library discuss the evolution, successes, and challenges of their programs and the future of art education for people who are blind or have low vision.

 

D. Shifting the Paradigm: Investing in the Next Generation of Arts Leaders (High School and Beyond)
Yanira Gonzalez, Education Coordinator, Jason Steer, Education Manager, Rebecca Cutino, Apollo Young Producer, Apollo Theater

Youth programs can be a catalyst in the development of the next generation of managers, technicians, producers, and artists. The Apollo Theater’s programs connect youth with professionals in the performing arts and entertainment industries and advance their career opportunities through hands-on experiences with behind-the-scenes jobs and professions. In this workshop, participants will learn how to implement youth-driven programming and events at their organizations to engage the next generation of artists and arts administrators.

 

E. Nuggets of Free: Supporting Uncensored Creative Spaces for Girls/Young Women of Color
Toya Lillard, Executive Director, Ianne Fields Stewart, Program Director, Juliany Taveras, Teaching Artist, viBe Theater Experience

This session will give participants useful strategies and techniques for collaborative art-making specifically and intentionally with girls/young women of color, many of whom face unique challenges in finding safer spaces to express themselves, uncensored and untethered by restrictions on what they say, how they speak, and/or misperceptions about their capabilities.

 

F. Expanding and Enriching the Ways We Evaluate Impact, Part I
Dennie Palmer Wolf, Principal, WolfBrown; Lindsey Buller Maliekel, Director of Education/Public Engagement, Jamie Roach, Teaching Artist Researcher, Val Ong, Senior Education Associate, The New Victory Theater

In this session, participants will explore how to expand and enrich the ways in which they measure the impact of their programs on youth. They will examine how the values and practices native to their artistic work can enrich the usual set of outcomes (e.g., grades, test scores, attendance data, etc.). The session will include examples from theater, visual arts, and creative writing that participants can build on to develop new approaches for their own current work.

 

G. Interactive Storytelling and the English Language Learner: Physicalizing Language, Part I
Helen Wheelock, Director, Early Learning Program, Courtney McClellan, Assistant Director, Early Learning Program, CUNY Creative Arts Team

This workshop explores how interactive storytelling practices support the English Language Learner in developing fluency and acquiring vocabulary. The focus will be on participants’ practice, exploring how by working intentionally to simplify, clarify, and physicalize their communication strategies they can help bridge gaps, diffuse tensions and miscommunication, and support building trust and collaboration between communities speaking diverse languages.

 

H. I Know Good Work Is Happening, But How Do I Talk About It?
Dr. Jennifer Katona, Director, Graduate Program in Educational Theatre, The City College of New York

How often have you been asked to describe the outcomes of your programming? Or to prove your school programs and partnerships are successful? You have stories to share of individual student growth, but how do you quantify this? How do you write about the growth of those students in a way funders and school administrators will understand and appreciate? How does your organization reflect internally to determine if you have designed a program that’s sustainable? This session will explore and discuss primary program evaluation strategies to help you build early-level evaluations.

 

I. Meet-Up: Parents
Lisa Mitchell and Jennifer DiBella, Facilitators

The NYC Arts in Education Roundtable parents’ meet-up group is designed for arts educators who are also parents (prospective, new, and seasoned). This session will offer you a place to gather and discuss relevant issues and challenges. Share your child-care woes, stories of how you are managing a healthy work/life balance, secret parent resources, ideas for kid-friendly events, and more!

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A. Deepening Social Justice Practice in Arts Education
Hannah Weitzer, Cofounder, Seachange Collective

How can we promote gender, racial, and economic justice through arts education programs, school activities, and daily interactions? How can we ensure that good intentions aren’t reinforcing inequalities or injustices? This interactive workshop uses real-life case studies to explore the distinction between charity and justice work, good intentions and effective impact, and assumed knowledge and community needs. Participants will leave with practical tools to thread meaningful social justice practices into their arts education work.

 

B. Funding Equity: Shifting the Paradigm from Sustainability to Thrivability
Durell Cooper, Founder & CEO, Cultural Innovation Group, LLC; Margaret Morton, Director of Creativity and Free Expression, Ford Foundation; Holly Sidford, Codirector, Helicon Collaborative; Tom Finkelpearl, Commissioner, NYC Department of Cultural Affairs; Sharnita C. Johnson, Director of Arts, Dodge Foundation

Government, foundations, and arts nonprofits are becoming more aware of equity issues in the field, yet still just 2 percent of organizations receive 60 percent of all contributed revenue―an increase of 5 percent over the last decade. In this panel we will take a deeper look at the social and economic conditions that govern the nonprofit ecosystem and discuss effective methods to mitigate some systemic barriers and build a more thrivable future.

 

C. Lincoln Center’s Access Ambassadors: Self-Reflection and Peer Review Practices for Teens with Developmental Disabilities
Alison Mahoney, Manager, Accessibility, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts

Lincoln Center’s Access Ambassador program is a job-training program for young adults with developmental disabilities that incorporates in-school lessons and supervised volunteer shifts at Lincoln Center performances. This session, led by an Access Ambassador educator and administrator, will focus on self-reflection and peer review, as well as tools to modify these practices for different learning styles. We will also examine how student feedback and institutional support have shaped the program over its three years.

 

D. Teaching the Older Adult: Encouraging Creative Choices in Making Dances
Naomi Goldberg Haas, Founding Artistic Director, Magda Kaczmarska, Lead Teaching Artist, Ellen Graft, Guest Artist, Dances for a Variable Population

This workshop will explore best practices towards a range of movement choices in senior adult classes and instill an understanding of the mind‒body connection, particularly with a population that is sometimes reluctant to improvise. Working with three basic ideas—class structure, muscle strengthening, and prompts for imagination—DVP methods improve class attendance, enhance enjoyment, and build a greater understanding of the benefits of practicing dance as well as encouraging more creative expression in older adults.

 

E. The Art of Reflection: An interdisciplinary Approach to Learning
Mark LaRiviere, Cofounder and Chief Program Officer, Anya Levkovich, Program Coordinator, Children’s Arts Guild

Excite and engage your students with reflective techniques that connect creativity and self-expression to core classroom learning. This hands-on workshop will teach you how to deepen your students’ understanding of the elements of art and principles of design while integrating your lessons with language arts standards.

 

F. Expanding and Enriching the Ways We Evaluate Impact, Part II
Dennie Palmer Wolf, Principal, WolfBrown; Lindsey Buller Maliekel, Director of Education/Public Engagement, Jamie Roach, Teaching Artist Researcher, Val Ong, Senior Education Associate, The New Victory Theater

In this session, participants will explore how to expand and enrich the ways in which they measure the impact of their programs on youth, exploring how the values and practices native to their artistic work can enrich the usual set of outcomes (e.g., grades, test scores, attendance data, etc.). The session will include examples from theater, visual arts, and creative writing on which participants can build new approaches for their own current work.

 

G. Interactive Storytelling and the English Language Learner: Physicalizing Language, Part II
Helen Wheelock, Director, Early Learning Programs, Courtney McClellan, Assistant Director, Early Learning Program, CUNY Creative Arts Team

This workshop explores how interactive storytelling practices support the English Language Learner in developing fluency and acquiring vocabulary. The focus will be on participants’ practice: exploring how, by working intentionally to simplify, clarify, and physicalize their communication strategies, they can help bridge gaps, diffuse tensions and miscommunication, and support building trust and collaboration between communities speaking diverse languages.

 

H. Good Play/Bad Play: Why Trauma-Informed Approaches Are Vital in Our Schools
Rebecca Dolan, Programs Supervisor, Alicia Thompson, Senior Teaching Artist, ENACT, Inc.

In this workshop, participants will use active exploration and creative methods to learn about working with put-at-risk youth in challenging situations. Participants will explore how trauma can result in negative behavior manifestations and will gain a better understanding of how trauma can affect classroom climate. The session will utilize engaging game play, active discussion, and an empathy-based model for understanding trauma and trauma-informed approaches.

 

I. Meet-Up: Early Career Professional
Facilitator TBD

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Thursday, April 25, 2019

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A. Bridging the Gap: Helping Veterans Share Their Stories
David Surface, Director, Veterans Writing Workshop; Kara Krauze, Founder & Director, Voices from War; Matt Gallagher, Founder & Director, Instructor, Voices After War; Jan Berry, New Jersey Coordinator, Warrior Writers Project

Interested in starting an arts program for veterans? Writing workshops provide arts organizations with a simple and effective way to become more inclusive of the veterans community. In this panel with leaders of top veterans’ writing programs in the NYC area, arts organizations and educators will gain valuable insights, ask questions, and reflect on how their own organizations can connect with the veterans community through the medium of creative writing.

 

B. Context and Perspective: Collaborative Designs for Urban Landmarks, Monuments, and Memorials
Kenneth Jones, Executive Director, Malika Khalsa, Education Director, Juliana Wong, Senior Educator, Andrew Coletti, Educator, Salvadori Center

Participants will experience a collaborative approach to project-based learning (PBL) as they design and build a landmark, monument, or memorial that addresses a community issue. They will learn by doing as they model a student educational experience. PBL instructional techniques as well as architecture, design, and art concepts; material exploration; and the manipulation of scale and proportion will be incorporated into the challenge. Participants will learn a dynamic approach to using art to engage communities.

 

C. Flamenco Pa’ Todos: Inclusive Classroom Strategies for Students with Disabilities
Juana Cala, Dance Teaching Artist, Greg Melnick, Guitar Teaching Artist, Flamenco Vivo Carlota Santana; Rachel McCaulsky, Dance Teacher, P.S. 396K

Flamenco Vivo Carlota Santana and P.S. 396K present a workshop on developing flexible and effective classroom strategies, props, and tools for working with students with disabilities using flamenco dance, music, and rhythm. Participants will engage in a hands-on flamenco workshop, explore the values of that experience, and articulate how it might support students’ IEP goals and align with work being done with related service providers.

 

D. The Arts Education Partnership: Tools, Resources, Actions, and Opportunities for the Arts Under the Every Student Succeeds Act
Jane Best, Director, Kate Wolff, Assistant Director, Arts Education Partnership

The presenters will provide an overview of the Education Commission of the States and its work administering the Arts Education Partnership (AEP). Established through a cooperative agreement between the National Endowment for the Arts and the U.S. Department of Education, AEP is the nation’s hub for individuals and organizations committed to making high-quality arts education accessible to all U.S. students. This session will include an overview of the work of AEP, AEP tools and resources, actions and opportunities for the arts within the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), and current AEP projects to highlight the importance of students’ access to the arts as part of a well-rounded education.

 

E. Stargate Theatre: Theatre-Making and Youth Justice, Part l
Judy Tate, Teaching Artist, Founding Artistic Director, Paul Gutkowski, Teaching Artist/Company Manager, Manhattan Theatre Club’s Stargate Theatre; Wade Handy, Assistant Director of Education, Manhattan Theatre Club

Theatre-making offers unique opportunities for justice-system-involved and otherwise disconnected young people to develop skills necessary to navigate today’s society. Stargate Theatre hires such young men to create and perform an original play each summer. Part I of this workshop focuses on program design. Session participants will explore organizational strategies to address some of the societally imposed challenges and trauma these youth face.

 

F. Too Much School, Not Enough Education: Lessons from 30 years of Culturally Affirming Arts Education
Dr. Angela Fatou Gittens, Executive Artistic Director, Chiwoniso Kaitano, Executive Director, Ifetayo Cultural Arts Academy; Alade McKen, M.S. Ed. Doctoral Candidate, Social and Cultural Studies of Education at Iowa State University, School of Education

This panel explores how supplemental programs (after-school, integrated programming, and Saturday Schools) provide a culturally affirming and nurturing environment for students who may not receive inclusive and culturally sensitive education during school hours. We discuss how specific programs such as Rites of Passage and Cultural History promote discipline, foster creativity, and provide solid grounding as students mature into adolescents and then young adults. We will also talk about the methodology, pedagogy, and outcomes of our African-centered educational approach specifically as it relates to communities of color and immigrant communities.

 

G. Meet-Up: Senior Staff
Mitch Mattson and Michelle López, Facilitators

Designed for senior-level staff from the arts in education field, this session will give space for participants to share pain points and success stories with one another. Topics such as leading courageously, supporting staff, and finding balance will guide our discussions. We’ll use the knowledge in the room and connect with our colleagues from organizations across the city.

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A Community Lunch for First-Time Attendees and New Roundtable Members will be held in Room 250.

Location: Shepard Hall, Great Hall & Room 250

Please note: Vegetarian, gluten-free, and kosher options (for those observing Passover) will be available.

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A. Roots (and Fruits!) of American Rhythm: An Interactive Survey
Shireen Dickson, Director, OKRA Dance Company

This session is an interactive survey of the rhythmic innovations that are the foundation of all uniquely American music and dance. We first summarize how European and Native influences merged with enslaved Africans retentions, from the ring shout to rhythm tap. Then we explore ways that these rhythm models can offer additional learning channels in your classroom practice, no matter the discipline or subject matter. Participants should come ready for moderate movement.

 

B. Community Arts in a Changing Neighborhood
Patrick Scorese, Associate Director of Education, Sana Musasama, Teaching Artist, Jamaica Center for Arts & Learning

Neighborhoods are in flux from waves of gentrification and changing demographics―and this requires community-based arts institutions to be incredibly flexible. How can organizations stay true to their origins while adapting to new environments? Are these mutually exclusive, and what does it mean for access and equity? This workshop will explore how one organization attempted to address these issues within the rapidly changing neighborhood of Jamaica, Queens.

 

C. Graphic Novels as a Springboard for Theater with English Language Learners
Alexandra López, Associate Director of Education, Andrea Dishy, Director, Learning English and Drama Project, Lincoln Center Theater; Richard Hinojosa, Director of Education, Kimberly Olsen, Teaching Artist, Queens Theatre

With eye-catching visuals and age-appropriate content, graphic novels and comics can be surprisingly accessible literature for young English Language Learners (ELLs). In this workshop, experience how Queens Theatre’s English Language Learner program (QTELL) works with elementary-aged ELLs to develop original songs exploring immigration based on The Arrival, by Shaun Tan. Participants will also examine a scene adapted from the Ms. Marvel comics through Lincoln Center Theater’s Learning English and Drama (LEAD) Project workshops with high school ELLs.

 

D. Integrating ELA and Clay Sculpture: Making Expressive Portrait Busts
Julia Schmitt Healy, Project Manager, Expanding the Frame, John Christopher Williams, Artist/Teacher, Jared Cardenas, Project Coordinator, Expanding the Frame, Studio Institute

Learn to integrate art and ELA! Create and take home a Clay Portrait Bust based on a character from literature. Find out how to depict a particular facial expression that reflects a character’s personality and demeanor. Presenters will share a free website funded by a federal DOE grant that has downloadable unit plans and resources for teachers, artists, and parents.

 

E. Stargate Theatre: Theatre-Making and Youth Justice, Part II
Judy Tate, Teaching Artist, Founding Artistic Director, Paul Gutkowski, Teaching Artist/Company Manager, Manhattan Theatre Club’s Stargate Theatre; Wade Handy, Assistant Director of Education, Manhattan Theatre Club

Theatre-making offers unique opportunities for justice-system-involved and otherwise disconnected young people to develop skills necessary to navigate today’s society. Stargate Theatre hires these young men to create and perform an original play each summer. In this session, participants will engage in theatre-making processes employing positive youth development principles that allow adolescents to enhance existing skills (artistic, academic, and social) while gaining new ones. Although this session builds on Part I, it is designed to be informative as a stand-alone as well.

 

F. Integrating Multi-Disciplinary Art-Making Through Music
Michael Morales, Teaching Artist, Amy Appleton, Director of Education, Tishawn Gonsalves, Visual Art Teaching Artist, Ana Dominguez, Dance Teaching Artist, Marquis Studios

This session helps to break down the barriers between artistic disciplines, showing several adaptations of movement and visual-art-based activities through the lenses of music. By tapping into our natural ability to feel and move with rhythm, we unlock the door to creative expression. Communal art-making is a powerful act, and by first connecting with the community, we strengthen our resolve and trust in our ability to create.

 

G. Strategies for Fostering Diversity and Inclusion Through Creative Aging
Ariana Elezaj, Deputy Director, Rose Ginsberg, Assistant Director, Arts and Wellness, The Center @ Lenox Hill Neighborhood House

Community spaces can offer the most robust programming in the world, but if it’s not inclusive and accessible to all, we do a disservice to our entire community. How can we use creative strategies to broaden the reach of our programming and engage diverse populations? What are some ways to address language and cultural barriers and leverage the ways we already can and do communicate with each other? Using Lenox Hill Neighborhood House’s innovative senior center as a case study, we will highlight some successful strategies for cross-cultural communication and help participants craft effective approaches unique to their own community setting.

 

H. The Importance of Trauma-Informed and Reflexive Teaching
Brooke Boertzel, Arts Education Consultant and Curriculum Specialist, New York City Children’s Theater; Heidi Landis, Drama Therapist, RDT, CGP, BCT, TEP

Through experiential learning and interactive discussion, participants will gain a fundamental understanding of the intentions and benefits of a trauma-informed, reflective practice. This workshop will explore complex trauma, how it impacts attitudes and behaviors in the classroom, and how educators can use a reflexive practice to benefit their teaching. We’ll examine implicit biases and power dynamics within traditional teacher/student relationships and review a case study of an organization that’s implementing this training into its practice.

 

I. Meet-Up: Teaching Artists
Marcus D. Johnson, Chris Gross, and Javon Howard, Facilitators

It is no secret: Teaching artists are the foot soldiers of arts education. In this ever-expanding field, teaching artists may experience uncertainty concerning their trajectory in arts education, pondering whether they possess the skills for arts administration, or even if there’s a place for them at the management table. In this Meet-Up facilitated by the Teaching Artist Affairs Committee of the Arts in Education Roundtable, we will explore the infinite possibilities of the teaching artist’s journey. We will use discussion and artistic reflection, and share knowledge and resources from those who have found divergent pathways through the field. Teaching artists and administrators of varying years of experience are welcome!

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Show your face AFTER Face to Face at The Grange! Order our speciality cocktail, and come mingle!
Time: 5pm-on
Location: The Grange 140th Street and Amsterdam

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The Roundtable is deeply grateful to the Graduate Program in Educational Theatre at The City College of New York for its sponsorship of the conference. Special thanks to Vincent Boudreau, President of City College; Mary Erina Driscoll, Dean, School of Education; Gretchen Johnson, Associate Dean, School of Education; and Dr. Jennifer Katona, Director, Graduate Program in Educational Theatre. Thanks also to David Covington, Executive Director, Alumni Association, CCNY; and Matthew Albanese, Events Manager, CCNY.

 

NYC AiE Roundtable