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NEW YORK CITY ARTS IN EDUCATION ROUNDTABLE ANNOUNCES NEW MANAGING DIRECTOR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                             

December 20, 2018

NEW YORK, NY – The New York City Arts in Education Roundtable is pleased to announce that its Board of Directors has appointed Kimberly Olsen as Managing Director. Olsen is a teaching artist, director, arts administrator, arts-integration consultant, and NYS-certified special education teacher. She has worked in arts education for more than nine years, with five of those years spent in New York City.

Olsen has been on staff with the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable since September 2017, first serving as Face to Face Conference Manager for the 25th Anniversary Conference and most recently stepping in as Interim Managing Director. She has had a prolific career as a teaching artist working in over 30+ schools across the tri-state area with organizations like New York City Center, ArtsConnection, Queens Theatre, and McCarter Theatre Center. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Childhood & Special Education from the State University of New York Geneseo and a Masters of Science in Educational Theatre from the City College of New York.

“The Board of Directors has been continually impressed by Ms. Olsen’s keen leadership strategies, extraordinary skills in marketing and social media, and her natural capacity for organizing systems and protocols. Her extensive background as an artist, educator, and administrator make her the perfect choice for our new Managing Director,” said Jennifer DiBella, Co-Chair of the Roundtable’s Board of Directors. “Everyone at the Roundtable knows that she will bring her experience and positive energy to help us continue to meet the professional development and networking needs of arts education practitioners throughout NYC and beyond.”

She is thrilled to continue working with the Roundtable in this increased capacity and hopes to create more professional development opportunities for the 1,000 plus educators, administrators, and advocates that come in contact with the Roundtable each year.

About The Roundtable

The New York City Arts in Education Roundtable improves, advances, and advocates for arts education in New York City. We are a community of organizations and individuals that shares information, provides professional development, and communicates with the public to promote our work in schools and beyond. Founded in 1992, the Roundtable produces a major annual conference, Face to Face; monthly professional development programs; a destination website; and other activities, in addition to ongoing advocacy and communications efforts for over 1,000 individuals and member organizations.

For more information please visit: www.nycaieroundtable.org.

Research undervalues social impact of the arts, review finds

An evidence review concludes that nuances around the impact of arts interventions are being lost as evaluations take “an overly narrow focus on data and measurements”.

Evidence of arts projects’ impact in both healthcare and the rehabilitation of criminal offenders is being overlooked or undervalued because of misunderstandings about what good research consists of, a new evidence review by Arts Council England (ACE) concludes.

Reviewing nearly 200 academic papers on arts interventions from the past five years, ACE says a reliance on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) – which are seen as a ‘gold standard’ in medicine but are often too expensive and demanding to be carried out effectively by arts organisations – is preventing a fuller appreciation of the benefits of participation in the arts.

It says there is a “growing recognition” among researchers that quantitative approaches like these “often fail to capture” the nuances of arts interventions, which become “lost in an overly narrow focus on data and measurements”.

Broadening the focus to include more qualitative and mixed method techniques could make it easier to improve practice and integrate arts interventions more deeply into the healthcare and justice systems, it suggests.

“The outcome that’s the easiest to measure is not necessarily the best thing to measure,” the report notes. “Is a different type of ‘gold standard’ possible?”

New style

The review comes as both Government and wider society become increasingly comfortable with the idea of using the arts to improve health, wellbeing and social outcomes.

In the context of criminal justice, it notes that culture can contribute to the process of ‘desistance – reducing reoffending – but says that because of the many factors involved, the “the challenge of demonstrating that a cultural intervention has had a measurable impact…remains daunting”.

It adds that while there is a growing body of evidence for the widespread benefits of the arts to physical and psychological health, medicine’s traditional emphasis on the RCT can mean this is ignored. Dementia guidance from NICE published this year, for example, did not cite arts and culture, “despite the wealth of arts-related research in this field being undertaken here and internationally”, including evidence of the benefits of singing.

The authors say that the prevalence of RCTs has serious practical implications for those wanting to secure recognition for the value and impact of the arts, given the high costs and time demands of gathering longitudinal evidence.

It adds that a key weakness of quantitative approaches is failing to capture the impact of the creative ‘transaction’ between artists and groups engaged in activities. Doing this, it says, is “very difficult, other than through narrative or other creative means”.
The report adds that there is relatively little funding for research into arts and cultural interventions compared to other kinds of healthcare, such as cognitive behavioural therapy.

“The low level of research funding has inevitably led to small-scale research, involving small groups of people, (often less than 100) for short-lived projects for which qualitative methods are often used,” they note, identifying potential for greater liaison between funders to provide more support for high quality research.

Blogging for ACE, John McMahon, Senior Manager Policy and Research, writes that judgements of artistic quality, the impact on participants’ creativity as a result of being involved in projects, and an understanding of the mechanisms that make projects successful, remain avenues for further research.

Author(s):

Photo Blog – Teaching Artist Meet-Up: Sip & Create

This November, the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable’s Teaching Artist Affairs Committee & Community-Word Project’s Teaching Artist Project hosted a joint salon for Teaching Artists around NYC. Over 40 teaching artists attended the event! Musician Michael Morales led us in an opening community activity that had us experimenting with egg shakers, drums, triangles, and other musical instruments to create something uniquely collaborative. After that, attendees had the opportunity to mingle, snack, and create individual and collaborative artworks to share, including visual and creative writing pieces. We finished the night with a fantastic and energetic open mic portion, where participants were able to share work they created during the event and in their individual artistic lives. It was truly a special evening that allowed us to put aside our teacher selves and celebrate one another as artists. We rarely get to do that in our day-to-day teaching artist lives, so it was a very special evening where we could all unwind, make art, and be in a supportive community.”

Chancellor Carranza Announces Record Citywide Investment in Arts Education

Annual Arts in Schools Report shows $17 million increase in arts education spending, record number of arts teachers, record percentage of schools working with cultural partners

NEW YORK – Schools Chancellor Richard A. Carranza today released the 2017-18 annual Arts in Schools Report and announced a record $433 million citywide investment in arts education, up from $336 million at the start of this administration in 2013-14. The $97 million increase in annual citywide arts education spending includes school-based spending in addition to the administration’s annual $23 million investment to expand programming, renovate arts spaces, and hire new teachers, which began in the 2014-15 school year.

Other highlights from the 2017-18 Arts in Schools Report include:

  • A record 2,837 full-time certified arts teachers in New York City schools, representing an 18 percent increase from 2013-14
  • 100 percent of responding schools collaborating with one or more cultural partners, up from 84 percent in 2013-14, and including 431 cultural partners citywide
  • Investment in partnerships and grants to 369 schools to support arts education, including specific programming for Multilingual Learners and Students with Disabilities

“A rigorous and enriching arts education provides students with an outlet for their creativity and helps them develop key skills such as critical thinking and collaboration,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio. “We’re committed to prioritizing the arts across our 1,800 public schools to help our students achieve success in the classroom and beyond.”

“Growing up, the arts brought everyone in my family together. Music opened my eyes to culture and history, kept me grounded, and taught me how to stay focused on a goal,” said Schools Chancellor Richard A. Carranza. “The skills we learn in the arts apply well beyond chords and color palettes, and help so many of our students thrive in and out of the classroom. Whether our students pursue an art form into college and careers, or it’s simply their favorite class of the week, I am proud that New York City is investing in high-quality arts education for all students.”

Under this administration, New York City has increased the number of full-time certified arts teachers citywide by 444, representing an 18 percent increase in the number of full-time certified arts teachers over the last five years. In 2017-18, the DOE had 2,837 full-time teachers serving students in PK-12, up from 2,770 in the previous year, and up from 2,393 in 2013-14.

For the first time in 2017-18, 100 percent of responding schools – 1,491 schools – reported working with one or more cultural partners, up from 84 percent in 2013-14. New York City schools partner with 431 cultural organizations citywide, bringing professional artists into schools to conduct workshops and exhibitions, and expose students to world-class performances.

The DOE continues to advance equity for Multilingual Learners and students with disabilities through partnerships grants, including Arts for English Language Learners and Students with Disabilities, Arts Continuum, and the Arts + Families Engagement program. These grants grew to serve 369 schools in 2017-18 – with approximately 200 arts organizations providing services – up from 144 schools when the grants launched in 2014-15. Additionally, in 2017-18, the DOE released the Arts and Students with Disabilities Online Resource Compendium(Open external link), a resource on best practices for educating students with disabilities in the arts classroom. Additional training using this resource is available throughout the 2018-19 school year.

The 2017-18 Arts in Schools Report also highlights a number of new and expanded arts initiatives that are reaching students across all five boroughs: family engagement activities including Borough Art Festivals and High School Audition and Application Workshops, and additional professional development for arts educators. In summer 2018, the DOE served 252 students through the Middle School Arts Audition Boot Camp, up from 98 in July 2014. Sponsored by the DOE and hosted by Lincoln Center Education, the Audition Boot Camp provides intensive support and targeted training to students auditioning for and applying to arts-based high schools in New York City. The program works to level the playing field by helping students from Title I middle schools prepare for auditions at competitive arts high schools.

“As Chair of the Assembly Education Committee, I would like to commend Mayor de Blasio and Chancellor Carranza for making this great investment for our students,” said Assembly Member Catherine Nolan, Chair of the Assembly’s Education Committee. “Arts education is so important in helping young New Yorkers to discover their talents, enhance their skills and enrich their lives. Expansion of the arts has been a priority of the Assembly majority, and I thank Speaker Heastie and my colleagues for all the state budget support for these initiatives.”

“An investment in arts education is an investment in the success of our students. Arts education improves our children’s cognitive abilities, including learning, attention, motivation and intelligence,” said State Senator José M. Serrano. “Studies have also shown the correlations between school-based arts instruction and high school graduation rates in New York City public schools. While there is still more work to do, I am heartened by the progress shown in this year’s Arts in Schools Report. As incoming Chair of the Senate Committee on Cultural Affairs, I look forward to working to ensure all of our students have access to a strong arts curriculum. I commend Chancellor Carranza for his commitment to providing our children with a well-rounded education.”

Together, the Equity and Excellence for All initiatives are building a pathway to success in college and careers for all students. Our schools are starting earlier – free, full-day, high-quality education for three-year-olds and four-year-olds through 3-K for All and Pre-K for All. They are strengthening foundational skills and instruction earlier – Universal Literacy so that every student is reading on grade level by the end of 2nd grade; and Algebra for All to improve elementary- and middle-school math instruction and ensure that all 8th graders have access to algebra. They are offering students more challenging, hands-on, college and career-aligned coursework – Computer Science for All brings 21st-century computer science instruction to every school, and AP for All will give all high school students access to at least five Advanced Placement courses. Along the way, they are giving students and families additional support through College Access for All, Single Shepherd, and investment in Community Schools. Efforts to create more diverse and inclusive classrooms, including Equity & Excellence for All: Diversity in New York City Public Schools are central to this pathway.

The 2017-18 Arts in Schools Report is available online.

Reposted from New York City Department of Education website.

Chancellor’s Strategic Arts Plan Focus Group for NYC AIE Roundtable hosted by NYC DOE OASP

Date: Monday, December 17, 2018
Time: 4pm-6pm
Location: Department of Cultural Affairs (31 Chambers Street, 2nd Floor)

The NYC DOE’s Office of Arts & Special Projects invites you to join Paul King, Executive Director, and Barbara Pollard, Project Manager, to assist in the development of a Arts Education Strategic Plan as directed by Chancellor Carranza.

This session will provide an opportunity to provide feedback and make recommendations about providing equity, access and excellence in arts programs for all NYC students.

Please note this event is exclusively for members of the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable. Only ONE member from each organization can attend due to space limitations.

To RSVP by Friday, December 7th, please CLICK HEREWe look forward to seeing you December 17th!

Center for Arts Education — Teaching Artist Salon: An Enchanted Evening (11/29/2018)

Come learn from your peers across arts disciplines!

Building on CAE’s audition model, teaching artists will participate in a series of mini-lessons led by experienced teaching artists followed by small group exploration of strategies and best practices.

This public event is designed for teaching artists, but is open to any interested arts educators.

Light refreshments will be served.

  • Date: Thursday, November 29, 2018
  • Time: 6:00 – 8:00 PM
  • Location: The Center For Arts Education, 266 West 37th Street

RSVP: https://caetasalonenchantedevening.eventbrite.com

 

From Our Friends at AATE!

AATE is now accepting applications for their 2019 Conference Session Proposals! For more information on how to submit, frequently asked questions, or session proposal tips please visit: http://ow.ly/Y5xO30meSK3

The 32nd annual American Alliance for Theatre and Education Conference will take place in New York City from August 1-5, 2019. The conference theme is “Activate AATE: Exploring Theatre Educators’ Role and Responsibility

AATE’s 32nd annual conference will be held in diverse, dynamic and vibrant New York City from August 1-5, 2019. In a city known for its diversity, culture, and, arts conference attendees will explore how theatre artists, educators, and scholars can be responsive and effective in the current socio-political climate. AATE Members are uniquely poised to be a force for positivity, action, and empathy building at this pivotal moment when the need for self-expression and dialogue is so palpable. The conference will provide a place for the arts education community to come together and spend time discussing the current issues through curated sessions and facilitated conversations. Join us in 2019 to question, to learn, to celebrate – and to Activate AATE.

Theater Master Workshop Invite from NYC DOE!

THE CHARACTER FORMULA: A Master Workshop with Larry Silverberg (11/1/2018)

LaGuardia High School’s LITTLE FLOWER THEATER

This is a truly special event on November 1.  I am thrilled to welcome Larry Silverberg, internationally renowned acting teacher and author, as he leads us through his transformative workshop The Character Formula. Subsidized tickets are $10.

Larry, who studied with Sandy Meisner and is an expert in his approach, explores the core human components of theatre, what he calls “the Human Map.” His session as has been described as a powerful path of aliveness, connection, and self-expression to impact one’s well being as well as one’s theater practice.

Hope you can join us for what promises to be an experiential evening designed to recharge as we look inwards as another step towards being responsive and supportive facilitators of our students bringing their passionate, whole, present and brave selves to any theater work.

  •  Location: Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School for Music & Art and  the Performing Arts (100 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY 10023)
  • Date: November 1, 2018
  • Time: 6:00PM – 8:00PM
  • Cost: Special subsidized fee of $10 per person
  • TO REGISTER: Please visit https://www.trueactinginstitute.com/character

**BOOK EARLY AS SPACE IS LIMITED  AND FEEL FREE TO SHARE THIS OFFER WITH A GUEST**

News from the OASP

In September, the Roundtable Co-Chairs (Sobha Kavanakudiyil and Jennifer DiBella) met with Paul King, the Executive Director of the Office of Arts and Special Services (OASP). Here is some information he shared with us:

  • The Office of Arts & Special Projects staff contact information can be found HERE. The most recent appointment is Alexa Fairchild, Arts for Diverse Learners Program Manager.
  • The new Chancellor is very supportive of the arts in schools and committed to equity, access, and excellence. The NYC DOE will provide mandated implicit bias training to its employees within 2 years. Also, all teachers will participate in training to support culturally responsive pedagogy.
  • There is a focus to address the lack of sequential arts education instruction at the elementary school level.
  • The name for “English Language Learners” has generally transitioned to “English as a New Language”. The NYC DOE is developing strategies to be sure that ENL students don’t lose access to arts instruction.
  • The NYC DOE has restructured its website to communicate with constituents and NYC DOE personnel:
    • Main NYC DOE site (schools.nyc.gov) will be primarily for parents and families‎.
    • Info Hub (infohub.nyced.org) will be for cultural partners and other constituents with public facing resources.
    • WeTeachNYC (weteachnyc.org) will house materials and resources for educators; some content will require a NYC DOE login.

**The Roundtable will be hosting a special event in November with the team from the Office of Arts & Special Projects profiling the roll-out of the new New York State Arts Standards on November 13th from 4-6pm.  Registration is required for this free, members only, event.**

Roundtable Welcomes Interim Managing Director

NYC Arts in Education Roundtable’s Managing Director, Kyla Searle, will be transitioning out of her role this month. She has been awarded a fellowship with Harvard University, while also completing her MFA in Playwriting at Brown University. We are very proud of her and wish her the best of luck! As we begin the search for a new Managing Director, Kimberly Olsen, will step in as our Interim Managing Director and can be reached at kolsen@nycaieroundtable.org